News

Filter By:

Rauschenberg returning to his studio after a junkyard trip. Captiva, Florida, 1982

Philanthropy in Action

Oct 10, 2014
For nearly forty years, Robert Rauschenberg maintained a home and studio in Captiva, Florida. More recently, the foundation has sustained a commitment to the region by converting those facilities into a dynamic artist residency program, as well as by making a number of grants to area non-profit organizations. In fact, since 2012 the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation has invested approximately $3.2 million into the local economy of Southwest Florida (not including grants). It is in this spirit that the foundation recently announced a partnership with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation to...
Aqua Fanfare (Urban Bourbon), 1993, acrylic on copper and mirrored aluminum, 72 13/16 x 48 13/16 inches (184.9 x 124 cm). 

Robert Rauschenberg: Works on Metal

Oct 10, 2014
Gagosian Gallery 456 North Camden Drive Beverly Hills, CA 90210 November 1–December 13, 2014 I like seeing people using materials that one’s not accustomed to seeing in art. That has a particular value. New materials have fresh associations, physical properties and qualities that have built into them the possibility of forcing you or helping you do something else. —Robert Rauschenberg In collaboration with the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Gagosian Beverly Hills is pleased to announce an exhibition of Robert Rauschenberg’s works on metal of the 1980s and 1990s. This will be the first major...
Robert Rauschenberg white paper artwork
Untitled (Tablet Series), 1974, Embossed paper, and cardboard, 31 1/4 x 22 3/8 inches (79.4 x 56.8 cm)

Robert Rauschenberg: A Visual Lexicon

Oct 10, 2014
Castelli Gallery 18 E 77th Street New York October 9–December 20, 2014 Castelli Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Robert Rauschenberg. A Visual Lexicon. The exhibition includes work that spans the entire career of the artist, dating from 1959 to 2008 and realized in a variety of media. When viewed individually the works appear to be very different from each other; however, in reality they share a visual language unique to the work of Robert Rauschenberg. Rauschenberg adopted, and gradually allowed to reappear, many photographic sources for his work; Rosalind Krauss in 1997...