Jun 6, 2016



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn more about the Residency 20 artists.

May 10, 2016


The White House Historical Association, Artsy, and Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Launch “This Art is Your Art” National Student Competition


We are excited to announce that today the White House Historical Association, Artsy, and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation launched This Art is Your Art, an online competition that invites graduate and undergraduate university students in the United States to engage with the artwork in the White House.

The competition encourages students to select a particular work of art in the White House collection from a gallery on Artsy’s website, and submit a three-minute video that focuses on the historical and artistic context of the work. Five winners will be selected by a jury comprised of eight renowned artists, educators, museum professionals, and public figures:

  • Caroline Bauman, Executive Director of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum;
  • Melissa Chiu, Executive Director of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden;
  • JiaJia Fei, Director of Digital, Jewish Museum;
  • Agnes Gund, Chairman of the Board of MoMA PS1 and President Emerita of MoMA;
  • William Kloss, Art historian and author of “Art in the White House”;
  • Jan Krawitz, Professor of Documentary Film and Video at Stanford University;
  • Earl A. Powell III, Director of the National Gallery of Art;
  • and Kehinde Wiley, artist.

The winners will receive a trip to Washington, D.C. this summer where their videos will be shown at a special ceremony at the White House Historical Association. The deadline to submit is June 8, 2016.

This is the second collaboration between the Rauschenberg Foundation and Artsy, following the 2014 Emerging Curator Competition, to focus on the importance of actively engaging with and responding to works of art, and providing access to digital resources to students.

Read the full press release >

Visit the competition website > 

Apr 21, 2016


Still from Catching the Sun, a new film by director Shalini Kantayya


We are excited to announce a new initiative developed in collaboration with Sundance Institute that will support films and emerging media projects that tackle one of the most critical issues of our time - climate change and the urgent need for action. This initiative will identify and fund the creation of four projects, which focus on stories that address climate change with the goal of inspiring action. As part of this joint initiative, filmmakers and climate change experts will have the opportunity to come together for a Climate Change Lab in 2017 at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Island.

This collaboration between the Foundation and Sundance brings together two organizations with deep connections to the environment.  Founded in 1981 by Robert Redford, Sundance Institute is a nonprofit organization that provides and preserves the space for artists in film, theatre, and new media to create and thrive.

Risë Wilson, our Director of Philanthropy, said, “Sundance has a long history of nurturing new works of the highest caliber and giving them global reach. This commitment to artistic excellence, combined with an equally held concern for environmental sustainability shared by our founders makes this a natural partnership.”

The first project in this series, the documentary Catching the Sun, will premiere on Netflix on April 22, the 46th annual Earth Day. Telling the stories of an unlikely group of workers and entrepreneurs in the U.S. and China, it brings attention to the global race to lead the clean energy future. The Foundation and Sundance Institute will also support the film’s public education campaign, which seeks to empower local communities across the country with the tools to advocate for energy efficiency.

Watch the trailer for Catching the Sun >

Learn more about our collaboration> 

Apr 20, 2016


Rauschenberg in front of the Fish House with Global Chute (Kabal American Zephyr) (1982), Captiva, Florida, circa 1982. Photo: Terry Van Brunt


Throughout his career, Robert Rauschenberg used his platform as an artist to increase knowledge about global issues and to raise money for many causes and organizations.

The safekeeping of the environment and the notion of individual responsibility for the welfare of life on earth was one of Rauschenberg’s key causes. This commitment to the environment that extended throughout various aspects of his work and life took focus in 1970 when he purchased his first tract of land on Captiva Island. Rauschenberg viewed his residence in Captiva as dependent on the natural environment of the island. He therefore focused on the maintenance of this land as a natural habitat throughout his lifetime. Images from the surrounding landscape and wildlife, as well as of issues that affected the island such as water conservation, served as regular inspiration for his work. Over the course of forty years, he bought historic cottages and adjacent land to preserve and protect it from encroaching commercial development, and undertook a significant restoration of the landscape after Hurricane Charley in 2004.

Today the property remains intact as a pristine natural environment, hosting more than seventy artists each year for month-long residencies in Rauschenberg’s former home and studio.

,

Truce (Scenario), 2003


 

Apr 14, 2016



Rising Waters Confab II will bring together the perspectives of architects, artists, scientists, and writers to address issues of climate change. Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn more about this diverse group of creative thinkers.

Mar 30, 2016


From left to right: Edgar painting on the ledge and grabbing the window of Carmen's house. Photo: Thais Llorca Lezcano; #dalitwomenfight tour. Photo: Thenmozhi Soundararajan; Interior Rendering of the School on Wheels. Credit: Deanna Van Buren and Julia Grinkrug; 1Hood Media Academy Class of 2015. Photo: Njaimeh Njie; People’s Climate March, Hurricane Sandy Survivors, 2014; Floating lanterns carrying the written memories of project participants in Chile.


Chosen from a pool of over 600 artists, the 2015-16 Artist as Activist Fellows were selected for their commitment to tackling social and political issues through their creative process. Over the past year, these artists pursued new opportunities to advance their work and convened in Captiva for a week of networking and skill-sharing at the SEED Summit.

As they prepare to move ahead with year two of their fellowship, they reflect on how the Artist as Activist grant provided them with the resources to continue their work in addressing important global challenges:

CHEMI ROSADO-SEIJO | PUERTO RICO | EL CERRO

Chemi Rosado reports that the Fellowship allowed the EL Cerro community project to evolve and become self-sustainable. “The longer the project goes on, the more houses are painted which causes a chain reaction influencing more residents to become involved and thereby expanding the reach of the project into new areas of the barrio.” Read more about El Cerro and watch an interview with Chemi discussing his work >

THENMOZHI SOUNDRARARAJAN –DALIT DIVA | BROOKLYN, NY AND INDIA | #DALITWOMENFIGHT

The Artist as Activist fellowship helped Dalit Diva launch a massive solidarity tour across ten cities. Of her work, Dalit Diva states “[t]hese are the projects where you risk everything from personal safety, connections to people you care about, to even your notion of self. In risking these things, you pursue art as a form of inquiry that remakes you as it destroys you; creates as it redefines the very notion community.” Learn more about #DalitWomenFight and watch a video with the Dalit Diva discussing the goals of the project>

DEANNA VAN BUREN | SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, CA | POP-UP RESOURCE VILLAGE

For artist Deanna Van Buren, this fellowship made it possible for her to finalize a design for the mobile education bus, Pop-Up Village, and  “to position art, design, and beauty as a priority instead of just re-creating the institutional environments most of our stakeholders are exposed to every day of their lives.” Read about The Pop up Resource Village project and watch an interview with the artist >

JASIRI X | PITTSBURGH, PA | 1HOOD MEDIA ACADEMY

The Artist as Activist fellowship helped Jasiri to define future goals for his work and his project 1Hood. To him, “[a]ctivism is not trendy, though it may seem as so. In my opinion, it is borne of a merging of action, love, and hope. Similarly, an artist’s existence is intertwined with an innate desire to create.   As if without choice, we must create, or suffer the consequences. “ Learn more about year one of Jasiri X’s Fellowship and watch a video interview with Jasiri discussing 1Hood >

PEOPLE’S CLIMATE ARTS (PCA)  | BROOKLYN, NY | PEOPLE’S CLIMATE ARTS SPACE & MOVEMENT

With the Artist as Activist fellowship, People’s Climate Arts (PCA) worked on labor, immigrant, housing, racial and climate justice campaigns. PCA states that their work has progressed because by “[h]aving space for artists and workers in our community to work in conjunction makes the movement stronger...." Read more about year one of PCA’s fellowship and watch a video interview with PCA on Arts Space and Movement >

SUSAN MCALLISTER AND NAOMI NATALE | ALBERQUERQUE, NM AND CHILE | EN LA LUZ

During the first year of the Artist as Activist Fellowship, the Art of Revolution, (formed by Susan McAllister and Naomi Natale) worked with Chilean partners on En La Luz, a project aimed at gathering the untold stories from the 1973 coup in Chile. Read more about the Art of Revolution and watch an interview with Mcallister and Natale on the goals of this project >

The next group of Artist as Activist fellows, focused on racial justice through the lens of mass incarceration, will be announced this spring. 

Feb 29, 2016


Rauschenberg at Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles, 1969. Photo: Sidney B. Felsen © 1969; Rauschenberg's Collection, 1954.


We are pleased to announce a new Fair Use policy- the first to be adopted by an artist-endowed foundation–that will make images of Rauschenberg's artwork more accessible to museums, scholars, artists, and the public.

This new policy comes at an important moment for image rights, as more institutions are providing free and open access to their archives and digitized collections. Prior to 2015, the Rauschenberg Foundation, like many artist foundations and estates, safeguarded the use of images through licensing agents. Over time, the Foundation observed that the fear of violating copyright restrictions resulted in two unique challenges. First, due to the prohibitive costs associated with rights and licensing, many scholars and professors limit themselves to using freely available images in their lectures, presentations, and publications, which in turn can alter how art history itself is written and taught. Additionally, image licensing hinders the conversion of print publications to digital formats, due to the costs of obtaining rights for a second time.

Furthermore, given the costs and complexities around using images online and on social media, museums and other institutions are limited in the types of images they can post to their channels. As a result, individual users, not institutions, generate many images of artworks that exist in the digital realm. A lack of “official” images with correct captions and attributions leads to the perpetuation of incorrect information online and on social media.

In order to address these challenges and the changing landscape of image rights, the Foundation issued pilot licenses to a select group of museums in 2015, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), and the Tate Modern.

Inspired by the increased use of Rauschenberg artwork images as a result of this pilot license to museums, the Rauschenberg Foundation has decided to expand its Fair Use policy to the public at large.

Read the full Fair Use policy >

Read more in The New York Times >

Feb 26, 2016



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn more about the Residency 18 artists. 

Feb 16, 2016


From left to right: Bill Arning (Photo: Eric Hester), Victoria Camblin (Photo: Jill Frank), Lynn Crawford, Kevin Killian (Photo: Christopher Felver), and Cameron Shaw (Photo: Andres Gonzalez)

 

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, in partnership with Art in America, has launched a pilot writing fellowship to support arts and culture writing in regions of the country that are often underrepresented in the media. The goal of the fellowship program is to foster new discourse about arts and culture that reflects the diversity of the nation, and increase awareness of culturally rich enclaves often not identified as art centers.

For the inaugural group of fellows, five writers of diverse backgrounds were selected based on their demonstrated commitment to their cities and dedication to writing:

  • Bill Arning has been the director of the Contemporary Art Museum Houston since 2009 
  • Victoria Camblin is the editor and artistic director of the magazine Art Papers, which is based in Atlanta 
  • Lynn Crawford is a fiction writer and art critic based in Detroit, whose most recent novel is Shankus & Kitto (2016)
  • Kevin Killian lives in San Francisco and is a poet, author, editor and playwright of primarily LGBT literature 
  • Cameron Shaw is the executive director and founding editor of Pelican Bomb, a website dedicated to sustaining the visual arts in New Orleans 

These writers, whose disciplines range from poetry to short fiction, will produce one long-form piece focused on arts and culture in their respective city for publication in Art in America this year.

Read the first essay, written by Kevin Killian, now available in the March 2016 issue of Art in America. 

Read Bill Arning's essay in the May 2016 issue of Art in America.

Feb 9, 2016


Rauschenberg working on The 1/4 Mile or 2 Furlong Piece (1981–98) in his Laika Lane studio, Captiva, Florida, ca. 1983. Photo: Attributed to Terry Van Brunt

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is delighted to announce that the artist's The 1/4 Mile or 2 Furlong Piece (1981–98) will be shown at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing from June 12–August 21, 2016. Comprised of approximately 190 parts and stretching over 1,500 feet, this work has been described as a self-contained retrospective, referring to significant developments throughout Rauschenberg's career.

While it will be the first time this monumental artwork has been seen in Asia, it is thirty years since Rauschenberg’s ROCI CHINA was presented at the National Art Gallery, Beijing. The artist first conceived of the Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI) while collaborating with master papermakers in Jingxian in 1982. A multi-year international project, ROCI aimed to foster cross-cultural understanding through art.

Read Press Release >

Read more in The Art Newspaper >

Jan 6, 2016



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 17 artists.

Dec 22, 2015


Shirin Neshat, Ghada and Sayed, 2013. Images courtesy Gladstone Gallery


With support from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Shirin Neshat created a series of portraits titled Our House is On Firea project that explored Egypt in the aftermath of the Arab Spring. The foundation is donating two limited edition prints from this series to thirty-three colleges and universities around the world.

​“Neshat's project embodies Rauschenberg’s own belief that art could change the dialogue for challenging international issues,” said Christy MacLear, executive director of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. “Our goal with this donation is to encourage dialogue about the portraits’ artistic, cultural, and political value while also creating an opportunity for academic departments to collaborate with school museums and galleries.”

The selected institutions submitted proposals on how they would incorporate the portraits into their curriculum in a way that was committed to using them to foster challenging conversations on a range of issues. A few innovative ideas include displaying the prints in Columbia Law School and using them as case studies for human rights issues, and hosting a panel discussion on Christianity, Islam, and Judaism at University of Pennsylvania.

See the full list of recipients >

Dec 18, 2015


The Anagram Series: Rauschenberg at Work, 2015. Video: color, 4 minutes 32 seconds. Courtesy Pace Gallery, New York. Original film footage shot by Film Odyssey, Inc., for the PBS documentary Robert Rauschenberg: Inventive Genius. Courtesy Film Odyssey, Inc. All rights reserved. Licensed by Pace 2015.


The foundation is pleased to announce that Robert Rauschenberg: Anagrams, Arcadian Retreats, Anagrams (A Pun) will remain on view at Pace Gallery, 534 West 25th Street, New York, until January 16, 2016. The exhibition showcases three powerful late series, begun in the mid-1990s, where Rauschenberg made digital color transfers from his own photographs, often taken during his extensive world travels.

The Anagrams series (1995-7) first premiered at Pace in 1996, in an exhibition organized by the gallery’s founder, Arne Glimcher. Glimcher’s reminiscences of Rauschenberg and the Anagrams exhibition at Pace are recorded in his newly released Oral History interview, conducted for the Robert Rauschenberg Oral History project in partnership with the Columbia Center for Oral History Research. 

The foundation is also delighted to share two short films of Rauschenberg created from outtakes of a film directed by Karen Thomas, Inventive Genius (1999). Shown for the first time at Pace Gallery with the current exhibition, Rauschenberg at Work documents the artist creating transfer works, while Rauschenberg at Pace records the artist and Glimcher discussing the installation of the original Anagrams exhibition in 1996. Footage courtesy of Film Odyssey, Inc. 

Dec 16, 2015


Rauschenberg with his silkscreen painting Windward (1963), ca. 1967. Photography Collection, Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives, New York. 


The foundation is pleased to announce a new licensing and cause marketing initiative, which will celebrate Rauschenberg’s role among twentieth century artists, as well as his activism and generosity.

Companies will partner with the foundation to use Rauschenberg’s art to develop products and create awareness of key social issues important to the artist, such as art and education, environmental protection, and global freedom of expression. 

The launch of this program will coincide with a series of Rauschenberg Retrospectives. The first exhibition will be held at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing, China (Summer 2016) followed by a major retrospective opening at the Tate Modern in London (Fall 2016), which will then travel to the Museum of Modern Art in New York (Spring 2017), and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (Fall 2017).

Read full press release >

Dec 8, 2015


Rising Water residents working together in Captiva, FL. Video by Dancing Camera

In the spring of 2015 twenty artists and scientists were invited by the Foundation to convene in Captiva, Florida for the first-ever Rauschenberg Residency focused on climate change.

Curated by the artists Buster Simpson and Laura Sindell, the "Rising Waters Confab" was designed to spark a productive dialogue amongst scientists, activists, artists, island dwellers, and others, and work toward addressing the realities of sea level rise.

Some of the concepts generated during the residency have served as catalysts for projects taking place at ArtCOP21, a global festival of cultural activity on climate change happening now through December 11 in 51 countries around the world. One of these events is L’Arctique est Paris (created and produced by Mel Chin, Gretel Ehrlich, Ed Morris, Helen Nagge) a film project with the message that "the Arctic drives the climate of the world."Another is a video installation, The Lost Defenders (created and produced by Orion Cruz and Mika Yamaguchi) about those on the frontlines of the struggle to protect what’s left of our environment. Back in Florida, the City of Hialeah presents CLIMA by Xavier Cortada.

In his summary document about the Confab Buster Simpson writes: The intent of the Rising Waters Confab was to further Rauschenberg’s lifelong approach to use art as a catalyst for social and environmental change, and to bring together artists, scientists, and other creative thinkers in this endeavor. This powerful new video filmed during Rising Waters Confab reveals how the Rauschenberg Residency serves as an effective platform for cross-disciplinary approaches to problem solving and the cultivation of ideas that become motivators for action. 

Watch the Rising Waters Confab video >

Learn more about Rising Waters Confab >

Dec 4, 2015


Installation view of Robert Rauschenberg: ROCI Works from the National Gallery of Art, Academy Art Museum, Easton, Maryland, December 5, 2015  – March 6, 2016. All artwork by Robert Rauschenberg: Cuban Acre / ROCI CUBA, 1988; Narcissus / ROCI USA (Wax Fire Works), 1990; Untitled (Tire for Rose), 1995; Seminole Host / ROCI USA (Wax Fire Works), 1990; and Tibetan Garden Song / ROCI TIBET, 1996. Photo by George Holzer.


The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is pleased to announce the opening of Robert Rauschenberg: ROCI Works from the National Gallery of Art and Robert Rauschenberg: Kyoto, Sri Lanka, and Thai Drawings at the Academy Art Museum (AAM), Easton, Maryland. Also on view at the AAM is the The ROCI Road to Peace: Experiments in the Unfamiliar, an exhibition curated by the 2014 winner of the Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition, Nicole Bray. The Emerging Curator competition, a partnership between the foundation and Artsy, received proposals from Brazil, France, Iran, Peru, Puerto Rico, Romania, the United Kingdom, and the United States. All three exhibitions are on view at the Museum through March 6, 2016, and at Artsy

The Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI, 1984–1991), focused primarily on countries around the world where artistic dialogue had been strained or suppressed with the aim of promoting cross-cultural understanding through art. Bray’s exhibition envisions what a ROCI of today might look like, specifically examining how contemporary art utilizes technology to challenge and transcend geographic borders. Included are works by contemporary artists —Fikret Atay, Yto Barrada, Alfredo Jaar, Jawshing Arthur Liou, Pedro Reyes, Sebastian Schmieg, and Malgosia Woźnica—who share Rauschenberg’s belief in the power of art to catalyze positive social change. Also included digitally are Bray’s selections from an international call for student artists whose works share in the original spirit of ROCI. The emerging artists selected by Bray are Andrew Dines, Matthew Flores, Jeffrey Gomez, Ana Lucia Romero Rivero, and Ziyang Wu

The exhibitions are accompanied by a catalogue that includes contributions by AAM curator, Anke Van Wagenberg, Bray, and Donald Saff, the Artistic Director of ROCI. Saff’s interview for the Robert Rauschenberg Oral History project, conducted by the foundation in partnership with the Columbia Center for Oral History Research, can be found on the foundation website. On January 29th at 6:00 pm. Saff will speak on his longtime collaboration with the artist as part of the Kittredge-Wilson lecture series at the AAM.

Nov 18, 2015


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Shiree Teng facilitating a workshop during the 2014 SEED Summit. Video by Dancing Camera


Three years ago, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation launched SEED, a grant program to support groundbreaking projects in ten cities across the United States. Today the Foundation is pleased to announce that it will expand the SEED program to Appalachia, Houston, and Santa Fe in 2016, as well as deepen its support in Detroit and New Orleans. Moving into Appalachia and Santa Fe will allow SEED funding to reach more rural and indigenous communities, while deepening investment in Detroit and New Orleans will further fuel these cities as hotbeds for exceptional cultural practices.

Over the next several months, the Foundation will work with local nominators in each area to identify arts organizations or projects that may have been under the radar to date but are exemplars in pushing the boundaries of their medium, pursuing new operating models, or otherwise contributing to the innovation of their local cultural landscape.

The Foundation’s decision to expand the program follows the success of its pilot support to 36 cultural projects in Atlanta, Boise, Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, Kansas City, Phoenix, Portland, Providence, and New Orleans. Grantees frequently point to the transformative impact of SEED’s angel investment as well as the ability to gather in Captiva with peers from across the country. Program participants have been able to build their administrative capacity, plan for the future, as well as form a lasting learning community. The program has also yielded artistic collaborations across regions. The next cohort of SEED grantees will be announced in Spring 2016.

To learn more about the SEED:

Find out more about the most recent SEED grantees.

Nov 16, 2015


Rauschenberg and a Tibetan official at the opening ceremony for ROCI TIBET, Revolutionary Exhibition Hall, Lhasa, December 5, 1985. Photo: Thomas Buehler

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation joins Artsy in congratulating artists Andrew Dines, Matthew Flores, Jeffrey Gomez, Ana Lucia Rivero, and Ziyang Wu, whose works will be included in a digital format in the upcoming exhibition, The ROCI Road to Peace: Experiments in the Unfamiliar. The selection of artists was made by Nicole Bray, curator of the exhibition and winner of the 2014 inaugural Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition. Through an international call for submissions on Artsy, students were asked to submit artworks that shared the ethos of the original Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI, 1984-91), to foster cross-cultural understanding and promote peace through art. Applicants came from Brazil, France, Iran, Peru, Puerto Rico, Romania, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The ROCI Road to Peace will be held at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, Maryland from December 5, 2015 – March 6, 2016 and will complement related exhibitions, Robert Rauschenberg: ROCI Works from the National Gallery of Art and Robert Rauschenberg: Kyoto, Sri Lanka, and Thai Drawings, both curated by Anke Van Wagenberg.

To learn more about the selected artists, please visit Artsy

Nov 10, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 15 artists.

Oct 30, 2015


Rauschenberg residency director Ann Brady introduces foundation board chair Christopher Rauschenberg; guest Mari Rodriguez and visual artist Willie Binnie; guest David Macke, visual artist Jack Pierson, and conceptual artist Mary Ellen Carroll; photographer Laurie Lambrecht, dancer Paul Singh, and dancer Grazia della Terza; Susan Davidson and senior curator David White; visual artist Kim Faler and vocalist/songwriter Somi; writer Emma Eisenberg, composer Zeena Parkins, and choreographer Jennifer Monson; visual artist Dawn DeDeaux; Christopher Rauschenberg providing welcoming remarks; Christopher Rauschenberg, guests, foundation staff, and residency alumni; filmmaker Charles Atlas 


In conjunction with the opening of the exhibition, Robert Rauschenberg: Anagrams, Arcadian Retreats, Anagrams (A Pun)Pace Gallery in Chelsea hosted a reception and reunion for the Rauschenberg Residency on Friday, October 23, 2015In attendance were thirty of the total of 188 artists who have participated in the first three years of the residency, along with their guests and foundation board members and staff. Participants from all but three of the fifteen residencies and five pilots were represented. Board chair Christopher Rauschenberg warmly welcomed the group, and the foundation's senior curator, David White, provided remarks, contextualizing the three artwork series on view.

Oct 22, 2015


Rauschenberg working on Lilac Role [Anagram (A Pun)] (1997), Captiva Drive studio, Florida, 1997. Photo: George Holzer, courtesy of Saff Tech Arts

On what would have been Robert Rauschenberg's 90th Birthday, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is pleased to announce an exhibition of important late work by the artist opening at Pace Gallery. A public reception will be held tonight from 6 to 8 pm at 534 West 25th Street, New York. The exhibition will run from October 23 – December 12, 2015.

Entitled Robert Rauschenberg: Anagrams, Arcadian Retreats, Anagrams (A Pun), the exhibition includes works from three series made during the mid-1990s into the 2000s, where the artist revisited image transfer techniques which he first explored on a smaller scale in the 1950s and 1960s. Using water-soluble inkjet dyes on paper, plaster, and polylaminate surfaces, Rauschenberg made digital color transfers from his photographs. Revealing the artist’s global perspective, the images are often derived from the photographs he took during his extensive international travels. Imagery for the Arcadian Retreats is largely derived from photographs he took in Turkey when he attended the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) in 1996. With images transferred manually using a burnishing implement, the artist’s hand is revealed, resulting in painterly and subtly lyrical works.

Accompanying the exhibition is a catalogue with a new essay by Jonathan Fineberg. Archival footage of the artist at work during the mid-1990s will be shown at the gallery.

Oct 5, 2015


Sidney Felsen and Rauschenberg at Rauschenberg’s seventieth birthday party, 1995. Photo: Barbara Lazaroff

In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Gemini G.E.L., the Los Angeles-based artists’ print workshop where Rauschenberg produced more than two hundred and fifty editions over the course of thirty-five years, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation posted a new, illustrated oral history interview today with Sidney Felsen, Gemini’s cofounder and Rauschenberg’s longtime friend and collaborator.

Read the illustrated transcript and listen to an excerpt of the interview on the Rauschenberg Oral History Project page.

Gemini’s fiftieth anniversary is also marked by the opening of The Serial Impulse at Gemini G.E.L. on view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, through February 6, 2016. The exhibition showcases seventeen print series created at Gemini over the past five decades by seventeen artists, including Rauschenberg’s Hoarfrost Edition (1974).

Learn more about The Serial Impulse at Gemini G.E.L. by visiting the exhibition page on the National Gallery website.

Sep 21, 2015


Residency 15 Artists

Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 15 artists.

Sep 14, 2015


AAA News Small Crop

Detail of poster for CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), 1965


In the era of colorblindness…[r]ather than rely on race, we use our criminal justice system to label people of color as “criminals” and then engage in all the practices we supposedly left behind. Today it is perfectly legal to discriminate against criminals in nearly all the ways that it was once legal to discriminate against African Americans. Once you’re labeled a felon, the old forms of discrimination—employment discrimination, housing discrimination, denial of the right to vote, denial of educational opportunity, denial of food stamps and other public benefits, and exclusion from jury service—are suddenly legal…We have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.                  

—Michele Alexander, The New Jim Crow (2012)

Today the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation announced the next call for proposals to its Artist as Activist Fellowship program. Applying lessons from the inaugural round of fellowship applications, the foundation will use an alternating thematic frame to guide its open call for proposals. During the 2016 and 2017 fellowship cycles, the thematic frame is racial justice through the lens of mass incarceration. Artists with ambitious projects that tackle this critical issue are invited to seek up to $100,000 in support. Applications to the 2016 cycle are due 5:00pm (EST) on December 7, 2015.  

There are 2.2 million people currently in our nation’s prisons or jails(1),  1 million of whom are African American(2). This is a 500 percent increase over the past thirty years and if current trends continue, one in three black males born today can expect to spend time in prison during his lifetime. Together, African American and Hispanics comprised 58 percent of all prisoners in 2008 even though African Americans and Hispanics make up approximately one quarter of the U.S. population(3)

This constitutes an epidemic. 

What we witnessed in the past year—from the countless deaths at the hands of police foregrounded in the corpses of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Freddie Gray, and Tamir Rice to the resulting events in Ferguson and Baltimore—were not new phenomena. What we witnessed are the signposts of a national crisis as old as America itself. These events are symptomatic of a national economy that from inception has pivoted on a permanent underclass sustained by the design of racial hierarchy. A hierarchy expressed first through the colonization of indigenous nations and the enslavement of Africans, then manifested through Jim Crow laws, and when segregation became illegal, reconstituting itself through the criminalization of black and brown bodies…bottoming out their humanity and more often than not the full rights of American citizenship.

Mass incarceration intersects with access to affordable housing, wealth inequality and economic justice, voting rights, the detention of working-class people of color labeled as immigrants, and equitable educational policy. In fact it is having a particularly devastating effect on young people. Nationwide, African Americans represent 26 percent of juvenile arrests, 44 percent of youth who are detained, 46 percent of the youth who are judicially waived to criminal court, and 58 percent of the youth admitted to state prisons(4).

It is exhausting to unravel the complexity of this issue, let alone to design ways to dismantle the social and economic structures that got us here.

And yet that is the task before us, one that requires an army of creative thinkers. If a new world is possible, it is the minds of artists, designers, culture bearers, and other creative professionals who will call it forth. We believe that at their best, art and artists are disruptive. The very nature of being a compelling artist is to generate new thinking and inspire new ways of being, whether through fostering empathy or by proposing radical alternatives to our current systems.

This year’s Artist as Activist Fellowship provides the opportunity for creative professionals who are committed to moving the dial on mass incarceration, and by extension racial justice, to seek a robust set of resources to advance their work. To learn more about the Fellowship program, including how to apply, click here.


1. The Sentencing Project (http://www.sentencingproject.org/template/page.cfm?id=10).

2. NAACP Criminal Justice Fact Sheet (http://www.naacp.org/pages/criminal-justice-fact-sheet).

3. The Sentencing Project (http://www.sentencingproject.org/template/page.cfm?id=10).

4. Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice via NAACP Criminal Justice Fact Sheet (http://www.naacp.org/pages/criminal-justice-fact-sheet).

Sep 10, 2015


Rauschenberg and a Tibetan official at the opening ceremony for ROCI TIBET, Revolutionary Exhibition Hall, Lhasa, December 5, 1985. Photo: Thomas Buehler

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Artsy, and Nicole Bray, the 2015 winner of the Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition, invite students enrolled at accredited institutions to submit artworks to be considered for inclusion in the inaugural Emerging Curator exhibition. The ROCI Road to Peace: Experiments in the Unfamiliar is inspired by the ethos of the original Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI, 1984–91)—to foster understanding and promote peace through art. The exhibition will be held at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, Maryland from December 5, 2015 – March 6, 2016 and will complement a related exhibition, Robert Rauschenberg: ROCI Works from the National Gallery, curated by Anke Van Wagenberg. The concurrent exhibition will include iconic works by Rauschenberg taken from the ROCI series, which have been graciously loaned by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

With his ROCI project, Rauschenberg traveled to ten nations around the world—Chile, China, Cuba, East Germany, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, the Soviet Union, Tibet, and Venezuela. Exploring diverse cultural traditions, new materials, and local artistic practices, Rauschenberg used his art to shine a light on the commonalities and differences of human experience. The original intentions advocated by ROCI are as relevant today as they were in 1984—to share, understand, and celebrate difference. In the words of Rauschenberg, "a one-to-one contact through art contains potent peaceful powers." The ROCI Road to Peace: Experiments in the Unfamiliar will explore what a modern day ROCI might look like in today’s social, political, and technological landscape.

For more information and submission instructions, please visit artsy.net/emergingcurator. Submissions will be accepted from September 10 through September 24, 2015.

Aug 31, 2015


Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artists-in-Residence 2015-2016

Photo: Sage Sohier


The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation (RRF) is pleased to announce the third season of the Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva, Florida.

Interdisciplinary in its focus, the Rauschenberg Residency is based on Rauschenberg's formative experience at Black Mountain College, North Carolina, and his belief that art can affect positive social change. Sited on the grounds of Rauschenberg's former home and studio on Captiva Island, the Residency maintains a robust commitment to the preservation of the land—its history and the stewardship of the natural environment. 

Each year the foundation appoints an anonymous group of artists, arts administrators, curators, and partner organizations to identify emerging and recognized artists and other creative thinkers. The foundation has, for the second year, invited an artist to organize a residency focused on the environment

Of the nine, five-week residencies this season, six include invited artists in a wide range of disciplines, while three have a particular focus: a family residency for artists with young children; a performance residency held in partnership with Danspace, New York; and the second Rising Waters Confab, to address climate change. 


2015–16 Residents

The 2015–16 participants represent diverse ages, geographies, and disciplines. They range in age from twenty-five to seventy-eight, and originate from fourteen states, and thirteen countries, including Botswana, Greece, Ireland, South Africa, and Vietnam. The array of disciplines includes: choreography, dance, interdisciplinary filmmaking, painting, photography, poetry, sculpture, and sound art.

September 21–October 23, 2015—Muriel Miguel Borst, Andries Botha, Maria Hassabi, Naomi Natale, Silke Otto-Knapp, Cauleen Smith, Tamara Staples

November 16–December 18, 2015—Susan Banyas, Will Cotton, LeBrie Rich, Louise Steinman, Lavinia Vago, Kate Wallich, Bill Will

January 11–February 12, 2016—Jane Hirshfield, Victoria Marks, Susan McAllister, Danny McCarthy, Mick O’Shea, Jasiri X, Bob Tannen, James Weingrod

February 29–April 1, 2016—Katie Aliprando, Caitlin Cherry, Ty Defoe, David Harper, Jill Sigman, Alex Smith, Dana Wheeler-Nicholson, Christopher Williams

April 18–May 18, 2016—Rising Waters Confab II organized by Buster Simpson

June 13–July 15, 2016—Family Residency: David Hartt, Ralph Lemon, Meleko Mokgosi, Chemi Rosado

August 1–September 2, 2016—Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Magdalena Campos-Pons, Josephine Halvorson, Steffani Jemison, Dinh Q. Lê, Neil Leonard, Harold Mendez, Sohrab Mohebbi, Thenmozhi Soundararajan, Deanna Van Buren

September 19–October 21, 2016—Performance Residency with Wally Cardona in partnership with Danspace, New York.

November 14–December 16, 2016—Raul Ayala, Kevin Beasley, Jen Bervin, Fernanda Espinosa, Matthew Goulish, Lin Hixson, Deborah Luster, Kate McNeely, Eiko Otake, Steve Roden, Rachel Schragis

Jul 31, 2015


R14 Meet the Artists Edit

Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 14 artists. 

Jun 15, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 13 artists

Jun 3, 2015


Film still from Mostly About Rauschenberg (1975), an unreleased film originally produced by Michèle Arnaud and Reiner Moritz, and directed by Christine Kozlov, Rauschenberg, and Mayo Thompson.


The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is in the early stage of processing our rich collection of archival materials. After learning about this exciting project, T: The New York Times Style Magazine visited the foundation to preview this comprehensive body of previously unexplored material on Rauschenberg’s life and career. View an exclusive interactive story on some of the treasures we have uncovered thus far at nytimes.com. Look for it in print in the June 12 issue of T: The New York Times Style Magazine

To learn more about our archival collection and obtaining access to it, please visit the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives Collections page.

Jun 1, 2015


The Rising Waters Confab Open Studio, May 27, 2015


The Rising Waters Confab, held at the Rauschenberg Residency (April 27–May 29, 2015), was inspired by Robert Rauschenberg’s lifelong belief in the power of collaboration and the potential for art to bring about positive social change. To address climate change, the most pressing concern of our time, the Rising Waters Confab convened an interdisciplinary group of creative thinkers, including artists, scientists, activists, educators, and island dwellers at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Island, Florida. Rising Waters Confab is the first time that the residency has been dedicated to a single theme.

During the five-week immersion, participants differed widely in their approach, background, and knowledge but were equal in their dedication to addressing climate change. “Confabbing”—or meeting, sharing meals, exploring the local environs, and making art—resulted in provocative and powerful collaborations and reflected a shared commitment to the issue. The Confab culminated in an Open Studio (May 27, 2015) when the public was invited to meet with the participants to view their individual and collaborative works in process. 

Rising Waters Confab was organized by Buster Simpson, Laura Sindell, and Anne Focke. Each of the twenty participants provided an invaluable contribution and made an inimitable imprint on the experience and the outcome of the residency. 

May 21, 2015


Fort Myers, Florida, 1980 (detail)


After a highly competitive process, in which nearly 500 organizations applied to the foundation’s call for proposals, nine organizations have been identified to receive support through the Climate Change Solutions Fund. Grant amounts range from $50,000 to $100,000 over two years for projects taking place in four countries: Micronesia, Peru, the United States, and Zambia.

From native seed collection and documenting the stories of Arizona farmers to developing a primer for artist-driven climate activism worldwide, the nine grantees represent a diverse collection of strategies for addressing global warming, each engaging with local and regional communities in ways that leverage cultural traditions and creative practices. 

To learn more about the inaugural grantees of the Climate Change Solutions Fund, please visit the Grants section of our website.  

Apr 22, 2015


Earth Day, 1970


The protection of the planet has been central to the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation’s mission since its founding by the artist in 1990. In 1991, through the sale of an edition and poster designed by Rauschenberg, the foundation raised  funds and greater awareness for the Earth Pledge that was announced at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) that same year. The foundation continues to uphold that original pledge “to make the earth a secure and hospitable home for present and future generations.”

For the next thirty days, in celebration of the forty-fifth anniversary of Earth Day, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation will highlight some of the grants and programs that extend the artist’s legacy as a champion of the environment. You can join the conversation by following the foundation on Twitter and Facebook. News items include:

Today the foundation is announcing $250,000 in grants to agencies working in Southwest Florida, including a grant to the Sanibel Captiva Conservation Fund, which focuses much of its work on the preservation of Florida’s fragile wetlands and other ecosystems. All of the awardees were identified through a partnership with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation to advance social innovation in the region. Southwest Florida is an area where Rauschenberg lived and worked for forty years and a place of ongoing investment for the foundation. To learn more about this partnership and the $250,000 in grants, you can read more here.

You can also read the newly posted Art in Context to learn more about Rauschenberg’s commitment to the environment in his art and activities. Among the highlighted artworks is Rauschenberg’s Earth Day poster, created for the first annual Earth Day on April 22, 1970, to benefit the American Environment Foundation in Washington, D.C. The poster is the first of many editioned works that the artist produced to support the social and political causes most important to him.

This Monday, April 27, 2015, will mark the beginning of a month-long gathering of artists, scientists, engineers, and activists at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Island, Florida. Entitled Rising Waters Confab, the meeting aims to spark new thinking and to influence civic will toward finding and spreading solutions for the rising waters of climate change. Participants will contribute to a blog that captures key themes and ideas.

Over the next month, the foundation will share more highlights of its work to support a healthy, sustainable planet, including announcing the inaugural grantees of its Climate Change Solutions Fund, a new initiative that spurs the use of cultural and civic engagement to advance solutions to global warming.  

Apr 17, 2015


Photos: Sage Sohier


During his residency, Tijuana-based artist Marcos Ramirez printed the front page of a different international newspaper each day for thirty-three days and screen-printed imagery that he had photographed around Captiva. Later, he will add text to create a personal journal that is juxtaposed against his worldview. Inspired by Rauschenberg’s legacy of printmaking and collage, Ramirez chose to integrate similar techniques into his work during the residency.

Other artists in Residency 11 were also influenced by the ways in which Rauschenberg worked. David Martine and Shawne Major experimented with screen printing with their individual art practices; Martine created three murals as he worked directly in Rauschenberg’s former studio, and which enabled him to step back in time to imagine Rauschenberg’s experimentation process; and Major also found the residency invigorating and plans to incorporate Rauschenberg’s methods into her next mixed-media works.

Catherine Chalmers arrived in Captiva with the idea to make screen prints but found it led to something else: “I brought several images for this purpose and when printing them into black and white and adding one color during the preparation, I inadvertently discovered an exciting way to create digital paintings. Although this finding led me away from making screen prints, I would not have discovered this new process without trying to manipulate the images for the screen. I am completely thrilled to have found a new method in which to work with my vast and beloved body of photographs.”

James Leary came to the residency in early March with a plan to complete the first draft of a screenplay, which he achieved. Yet two unforeseen projects also emerged: A series of 300 drawings and what turned out to be, in his words, “a complete surprise,” learning the process to create cyanotypes and executing a series of prints in collaboration with the art critic Charlie Schultz. Schultz also completed a writing project on photography and industry in America.

Photographers Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun finally found the time to print their Kodachrome slides that had been waterlogged during Hurricane Katrina, and which they had kept in a freezer that was found on the street to preserve them.

Two artists during the residency used elements that had washed ashore. Diane Schenandoah sculpted driftwood and wood from Australian pine and Sea Grape trees. Charles Lindsay used the carcasses of horseshoe crabs in a sculpture piece for an upcoming exhibition. He noted, “The re-discovery of horseshoe crabs is significant by adding a perfect symbol species to the part of my artistic mission that considers nonhuman intelligence and vast time scales. My challenge continues to be about bringing nature, technology, and the nature of existence into the contemporary art domain. The pace and arc of this project speaks well to adaptation and to responding to a location and situation, which is a high compliment to the residency itself.”

Apr 14, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about Residency 12 and Rising Waters Confab.  

Mar 8, 2015


Photo: Attributed to Steve Paxton


After a highly competitive process, in which more than 600 artists applied to the foundation’s call for proposals, the inaugural cohort of Artist as Activist Fellows, as well as Travel and Research Grantees, has been selected. Four artists and two artist collectives will receive direct grants ranging from $30,000 to $100,000 over two years, along with access to opportunities for professional development. Additionally, nine other socially engaged artists will receive grants ranging from $2,500 to $8,500 to pursue opportunities for travel and/or research related to their activist practice. All told by the first half of 2015, the Rauschenberg Foundation will have invested $650,000 in fifteen independent artists and collectives applying their creative practice to the public sphere, along with ten organizations that are exemplary pioneers in supporting artists who work this way.

You can learn more about the Artist as Activist program’s Two-Year Fellows or the Travel and Research Grantees by visiting the Grants section of our website. To read the press release click here.

Feb 26, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 11 artists.

Feb 12, 2015


Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Executive Director Christy MacLear joined First Lady Michelle Obama at the White House on Tuesday, February 10, to celebrate the installation of Rauschenberg’s Early Bloomer [Anagram (A Pun)]1998. Also included in the White House Dining Room are works by artists Anni Albers, Josef Albers, and Alma Thomas. The installation is now open to the public

This work, part of a series Rauschenberg made using digital color transfers, was donated in honor of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation in 2011. It was first unveiled during the Celebration of American Art presentation, hosted by Michelle Obama at the White House on June 5, 2013. Early Bloomer [Anagram (A Pun)] is one of the first works of contemporary art to be displayed in the public rooms of the White House. 

Also on Tuesday, former Vice President Walter Mondale attended the Open Studio at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Island, Florida. During his visit to the residency, Mondale enjoyed presentations by vocalist Somi, musician Hervé Samb, performance artist Laurie Anderson, and actor Cheryl Lynn Bruce, and he viewed works by visual artists Manal AlDowayan, Kim Faler, Ann Hamilton, Brad Kahlhamer, Mario Martinez, and Carrie Mae Weems.

Jan 28, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 10 artists. 

Jan 15, 2015


Photos: Sage Sohier

Once the home of the Calusa Indian tribe and then two centuries later, a fishing destination for Theodore Roosevelt and Thomas Edison, Captiva Island, Florida, now boasts luxury homes on a street nicknamed the “Gold Coast.” But the enchantment of the land that Robert Rauschenberg embraced for forty years remains and is invigorated by the newest, and perhaps most itinerant, visitors to the island, the artists in residence at the Rauschenberg Residency. And so what does this small cohort of artists do for thirty-three days on this island in the Gulf of Mexico?
 
“I was able to work on thirty-five paintings and experiment with different surfaces instead of canvas (muslin, plastic, plexi). I experimented with different forms of hanging, suspending work from the ceiling like stretched cowhide or suspended from a point (this technique also allowed me to consider installation work more effectively than I am usually able to in my studio). The last five paintings at the residency incorporated plastic/drop cloth from the floor and allowed me to begin a dialogue between painting and performance,” wrote Gage Peer (Santa Fe). And did this differ from his original intention? “I did plan to work with painting, but the amount of work and the introduction of these materials and how they would change my painting process was not planned.”
 
For many, the experience transcends initial aspirations. “I accomplished so much . . . above and beyond my expectations!” wrote Laurie Lambrecht (Bridgehampton, NY), and so, too, for David Francis (Minneapolis), “The pace and depth of work on my memoir was far beyond my expectations that I remain flabbergasted.”
 
The plan is often best left behind, as Douglas Coupland (Vancouver) noted, “I think that if I arrived with a definite idea in my head and only worked on that idea, it would defeat the spell of the place.” The residency experience has also proven to be a trigger. “When I got home I had a creative explosion that could never have happened if not for the ideas from RR and their incubation there.”
 
Another artist, Brighde Mullins (Los Angeles), wrote afterward, “To be in a place where nature is still in charge was a huge influence. I felt like I had a different experience of time because of the proximity to the water and the plants and animals. Being on Captiva was a daily lesson in humility and in the finite capacity of humans. Being in Bob’s World was inspiring and calming. I remembered that I used to draw and paint and make collages of my play worlds (I’m primarily a playwright), and being around his work and his spirit reconnected me to the multidimensional aspect of creating a character.”
 
Collaborations took place slowly and organically. As Keith Sklar (Chicago) listed in his follow-up evaluation: “Experiments with residency staff Matt, Carrell, and Maria in silkscreen. Exploration of digital printing and Photoshop with Carrell and Ehren. An improvised performance with musician David Ornette Cherry and painter Gage Peer. Planned possible series of public artworks in collaboration with Dorit Cypis and Brighde Mullins, based on Brighde’s work on Phyllis Wheatley. Discussions and critiques of a range of residents’ art practices and ideas throughout the residency.”
 
The community was engaged, as well, through an outreach where the two musicians, David Ornette Cherry (Portland, OR) and Colin Gilmore (Austin) performed for 160 elementary school students at Sanibel School. Later the same day, an Open Studio was held in the Main Studio at the residency for fifty community members.
 
And there was time for other kinds of work, too, as Dorit Cypis noted. “Resting, listening, biking, dreaming, reflecting, questioning, sharing, communing, exploring, experimenting, recognizing others, recognizing myself, writing, wandering, wondering, walking, boating, beaching, bird watching, eating.”
 
The influence of Robert Rauschenberg pervades the residency as Mary Ellen Carroll (New York) reflected, “I thanked him constantly as he and his legacy made it possible to be there and to work as an artist. To have the people and equipment and facilities to realize 500 silkscreens and digital prints and paintings. . . .”
 
“I look forward to the months ahead to absorb and utilize the inspiration and ideas,” Laurie Lambrecht wrote, summing up the residency experience. “I learned much about myself; it was a time of growth.”

Jan 8, 2015


Renaissance Club begins planning a new project. Photo: Joe Rubino

The Lab School of Washington, with support from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, presents The Power of Art Conference, April 16–18, 2015: This is Your Brain on Arts.

In its twenty-first year, the conference includes a town hall with national voices in the arts, a day of workshops led by teaching artists at The Lab School, a fully arts-based school for students with learning differences, and workshops at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Participants will learn how to advocate for the arts, integrate the arts into core courses, and incorporate new practices into their teaching. The Lab School will provide for the programming costs for the three days, hotel accommodations, and meals. Admission to the conference is competitive and limited to forty visual and performing arts educators across the United States. Applications are open now through February 1, 2015.

Click here for more info and to apply.

For information about RRF’s history of support for The Lab School and The Power of Art Conference, click here.

Dec 8, 2014


Caryatid Cavalcade I / ROCI CHILE, 1985

Caryatid Cavalcade I / ROCI CHILE, 1985

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, in partnership with Artsy is pleased to announce that Nicole Bray, a student at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art, has won the inaugural Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition. With support from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Bray will receive a fellowship to mount a Rauschenberg exhibition in New York.

Bray’s winning proposal was inspired by the Rauschenberg Overseas Cultural Interchange (ROCI) project, which she argues remains as relevant today as when Rauschenberg first conceived of it in 1984. Click here to learn more about ROCI.

Read full press release

Dec 5, 2014


SEED Summit 2014


Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Hosts Grantees on Its Captiva Campus
Eighty-five nonprofit professionals from across the country join together at historic island residence

Beginning November 3, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation used its Captiva Campus to host eighty-five artists, entrepreneurs, community organizers, and social innovators from across the United States, and who have received support through the foundation’s SEED Grant program. The inaugural SEED Summit, which is intended to become an annual event at Captiva, brought these arts professionals together for a one week meeting to build skills, share knowledge, and form ongoing relationships. 

Download Full Press Release

Nov 25, 2014


Photo: © The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Courtesy Art + Commerce

We are pleased to announce the appointment of Francine Snyder as the Foundation’s first Senior Archivist. This inaugural position builds upon the newly launched website to make Rauschenberg's archives accessible to students, scholars, and the public. Snyder will be integral in providing materials for the future Rauschenberg catalogue raisonné. In addition, she will be responsible for establishing educational partnerships globally, identifying future grants for archival scholarship, and collaborating with other artists’ archives. Previously, Snyder was the Director of the Library and Archives at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Earlier this year, she was selected for the 2014 Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) and has written widely on archives and technology.

Nov 11, 2014


Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni

VOTE NOW for your favorite exhibition proposal! Follow @Artsy on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Google+ and like/share/comment on posts to vote. You can also share your favorite proposal on social media with #EmergingCurator.

Finalists' posts are now featured on artsy.net/emergingcurator.

The Finalists


Paisid Aramphongphan, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Nicole Bray, Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York
Grant Johnson, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Nefertari Juarez Aguilar, Centro de Cultura Casa Lamm, Mexico City
 

In collaboration with curators from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, the winner will have the opportunity to curate an exhibition at their campus art gallery with artworks from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation collection. The panel of judges includes John Elderfield, Branden W. Joseph, Shirin Neshat, Christopher Rauschenberg, and Sarah Roberts, who determined the four finalists. The winner is chosen by you. Voting ends November 18, 2014 11:59 pm EST (Eastern Standard Time). 

Artsy received 138 thought-provoking exhibition proposals from four continents, 22 countries, and 78 cities, such as Buenos Aires, Hong Kong, London, Melbourne, Mexico City, Milan, Moscow, and more. It was a tough decision for the judges to choose the finalists, and we would like to recognize seven exceptional proposals as Honorable Mentions. Congratulations to all of the students for participating!

Honorable Mentions 


Minnie Atairu (George Washington University, Washington, D.C.)
Caroline Barnett (New York University, Institute of Fine Arts)
Ashley Duhrkoop (Columbia University, New York)
Megan Govin (Pratt Institute, New York)
Manuela Reyes (School of Visual Arts, New York)
Oliver Shultz (Stanford University, California)
Nina Wexelblatt (Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts)
 

Nov 10, 2014


Photo: © The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Courtesy Art + Commerce

New Grant Program, Calls for Proposals Addressing Climate Change 


The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation announced today the creation of the Climate Change Solutions Fund to support cross-disciplinary responses to global warming, issuing an open call for grant proposals from organizations whose work matches the Fund’s objectives.

The Climate Change Solutions Fund pushes back against the “doom and gloom” narrative that emphasizes impending disaster or frames the scale of the problem as insurmountable. Instead the new grant program seeks projects that facilitate new, sustainable ways of being and living. That may translate into pragmatic tactics like advancing alternative energy sources or it may be more adaptive strategies like developing new economic systems. For more information about the grant’s guidelines and requirements, including how to register for an application webinar, visit our Apply Now page

Projects of particular interest are those that apply a systemic lens to the root causes of global warming; enroll the leadership of frontline communities most vulnerable to the impact of climate change; push for broad based civic engagement and community action; and wherever possible leverage the value artists and culture bearers bring to processes for devising and deploying practical solutions to this global crisis.

Read full press release

Nov 7, 2014


Photos: Sage Sohier


On November 17, 2014, Rauschenberg Residency 9 begins. Ten artists, including musicians, visual artists, and writers from across the United States and Canada will arrive to work, share meals, play, commune, and collaborate at the residency that provides them with the time, space, and resources to explore new possibilities. 
 
“I may be asking volunteers to help me collect drift items from local beaches,” explained Douglas Coupland. A writer who has published fourteen novels and several nonfiction works, Doug is also a visual artist. It will be his visual practice that he intends to focus on during his five weeks in Captiva. Meanwhile, time away from routine will allow poet and playwright Brighde Mullins to complete unfinished writing projects and start new ones.
David Ornette Cherry, whose music mixes world and jazz idioms, plans to edit video and audio, create a book prototype, paint, and experiment with Pro Tools, the audio tools software programs. Joining him in the Pro Tools tutorial is songwriter Colin Gilmore, who “turns life experiences into poetry, and puts poetry to soundwaves and lighwaves that bring it to life.”
 
Experimentation with new methods continues to be the hallmark of the Rauschenberg Residency, since the pilot program began in 2012, with screenprinting among the most popular. Photographer Laurie Lambrecht and visual artist, educator, mediator, and community-builder Dorit Cypis both plan to investigate the form. While Laurie will also work with cyanotypes and photography, Dorit expects to write, work with small props, fabricate, print text photographs, and work with writer and collaborator David Francis.
 
The main studio, built for Rauschenberg in 1990, is a majestic 16,000-square-foot, two-story, white building that presents a blank canvas to each new group of residents. It will be filled with paintings by Keith Sklar and Gage Peer, while the 3-D studio will be used by Conceptual artist Mary Ellen Carroll to work in a variety of mediums, including printmaking, photography, video, and fabrication.

Oct 28, 2014


Rauschenberg returning to his studio after a junkyard trip. Captiva, Florida, 1982

For nearly forty years, Robert Rauschenberg maintained a home and studio in Captiva, Florida. More recently, the foundation has sustained a commitment to the region by converting those facilities into a dynamic artist residency program, as well as by making a number of grants to area non-profit organizations. In fact, since 2012 the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation has invested approximately $3.2 million into the local economy of Southwest Florida (not including grants). It is in this spirit that the foundation recently announced a partnership with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation to resource local non-profits who are working to improve the quality of life of Southwest Florida residents. Today marks the launch of that new grant program. Interested applicants can learn more by visiting www.floridacommunity.com or contacting Jacqueline Ehlers at JEhlers@floridacommunity.com or by phone at 239-274-5900.  

Oct 23, 2014


Aqua Fanfare (Urban Bourbon), 1993, acrylic on copper and mirrored aluminum, 72 13/16 x 48 13/16 inches (184.9 x 124 cm). 

456 North Camden Drive
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
November 1–December 13, 2014
 

I like seeing people using materials that one’s not accustomed to seeing in art. That has a particular value. New materials have fresh associations, physical properties and qualities that have built into them the possibility of forcing you or helping you do something else.
—Robert Rauschenberg

In collaboration with the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Gagosian Beverly Hills is pleased to announce an exhibition of Robert Rauschenberg’s works on metal of the 1980s and 1990s. This will be the first major presentation of his work on the West Coast since MOCA’s acclaimed traveling exhibition of the Combines in 2006.

Rauschenberg’s protean outlook ushered in a new era of postwar American art in the wake of Abstract Expressionism with a free and experimental approach that drew inspiration from conceptual, materialist, and gestural precedents. His inventive use of discarded materials and appropriated images eviscerated distinctions between medium and genre, abstraction and representation, while his “flatbed picture plane,” which absorbed found objects into the realm of paintings, forever changed the relationship between artwork and viewer.

“Works on Metal” traces Rauschenberg’s obsession, beginning in the mid-1980s, with the potential of metal. Exchanging canvas for flat sheets of metal mounted directly to the wall, he worked in consequent series using aluminum, brass, copper, and bronze, harnessing the natural hues and reflections of each. He then juxtaposed their intrinsic qualities with secondary processes, from the application of acrylic and enamel paints and silkscreened photographic images to his fine-tuning of chemical reactions and manipulation of industrial scrap and refuse.

For his prescient project of global diplomacy known as ROCI (Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange, 1984–91), Rauschenberg worked and exhibited in eleven countries including Chile and Cuba, silkscreening photographic images taken during his extensive travels onto huge sheets of copper and stainless steel. Drawing upon this bountiful image bank, his ongoing investigation of painting on metal would prove to be one of the most inventive periods of his career, taking on ever new inflections as he traveled to Mexico, Germany, Tibet, the former U.S.S.R., Venezuela, and other locations. In the Urban Bourbon series (1988–96), reflective depths overlap with fragmented photography and gestural brushwork; in the Borealis paintings (1988–92), chemicals and ammonium salts were applied to brass, copper, and bronze sheets to achieve corrosive effects; in the steely Night Shades (1991), acids were used to rapidly tarnish the mirrored and brushed aluminum surfaces.

Parallel to his works on flat metal surfaces, Rauschenberg collected discarded automotive parts, gas station signs, and other scrap materials, which he manipulated into both freestanding and wall-mounted sculptures; the so-called Gluts (1986–89/1991–94) echoed the Combines in their reconfiguration of found objects. Rauschenberg referred to the Gluts, which he continued to produce after the seven-year ROCI. tour, as “souvenirs without nostalgia;” he aimed to create art that was “as fresh, strange and unpredictable as what’s going on around you.” In the conceptual and material breadth of the metal works, Rauschenberg fulfilled the partial relinquishing of authorship, allowing art to integrate with the mess of life.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by Joachim Pissarro.

Oct 22, 2014


Untitled (Tablet Series), 1974, Embossed paper, and cardboard, 31 1/4 x 22 3/8 inches (79.4 x 56.8 cm)

18 E 77th Street
New York 
October 9–December 20, 2014
 

Castelli Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Robert Rauschenberg. A Visual Lexicon. The exhibition includes work that spans the entire career of the artist, dating from 1959 to 2008 and realized in a variety of media. When viewed individually the works appear to be very different from each other; however, in reality they share a visual language unique to the work of Robert Rauschenberg. 

Rauschenberg adopted, and gradually allowed to reappear, many photographic sources for his work; Rosalind Krauss in 1997 brilliantly described these visual sources as Rauschenberg’s “perpetual inventory.” Just as important to the repetition and arrangement of the silk-screened and collaged imagery is the playful juxtaposition of their placement, whether set one next to the other or, occasionally, one above the other. The combined effort of selecting images and juxtaposing and layering them reveals the artist’s perception of the work, and a single artwork may become like a diary of a day in the life of the artist.

Included in the exhibition is Untitled, a combine of a pocket watch, chain, and tin can created circa 1959, whose components are retranslated in other works throughout the show. Solvent transfers and collages on cloth and paper from the 1970s, including work from the Hoarfrost Series, offer a wider glimpse into the artist’s personal relationship to his materials and his interest in the temporality of combined images. The most physically imposing work in the show, at more than seven feet tall and 21 feet wide, Arcadian Survey (Spread), 1977, continues the familiar thread of visual repetition but introduces mirrored panels, an element that further contributes to the idea of duplicating and possibly multiplying the same image again and again. The white, collaged fabric panel in this multidimensional work echoes three works created as part of the Tablet Series in 1974, in which pieces of cardboard are sandwiched between layers of white paper in such a way that we may only perceive them through the changing textures of the surface. The most recent work in the exhibition is Untitled, 2008, a patinated and painted bronze sculpture of a ruler balanced upon a ball of twine. The juxtaposition of the materials of this work reinforces the artist’s interest in creating a conflict through which something ethereal may emerge.

Sep 22, 2014


Rauschenberg and Walter Hopps discussing *Minutiae*(1954) during the installation of the retrospective exhibition *Robert Rauschenberg*, National Collection of Fine Arts, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, 1976.  Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni

The foundation, in partnership with Artsy, is hosting a competition for undergraduate and graduate students worldwide.  Win the opportunity to mount a Rauschenberg exhibition at your campus.

The competition intends to foster a new generation of curators by providing online access to digital resources and collections, as well as to explore new curatorial perspectives, scholarship, and dialogues on art. The competition launches today, September 22, 2014, and closes October 20, 2014. Please visit Artsy.net for full guidelines to participate, and visit the Artist section of our website to begin your research and explore Rauschenberg's life and work in depth. 

Sep 8, 2014


Designer Una Lee presents at the Opening Ceremony of the 2014 Allied Media Conference. Photo: Ara Hawrani

Today, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation announced the launch of an open call for proposals for artists whose work intersects with activism. Up to $100,000 in project support and up to $10,000 in travel and research grants will be provided to artists and collectives working to address pressing challenges facing societies in the U.S. and beyond. The term artist has been broadly defined to include artists of all disciplines, architects, cultural workers, designers, master craftsmen, musicians, performers, photographers, storytellers, cultural organizers, etc. To read the press release click here, or visit the Artist as Activist program page in our Grants section.

Sep 6, 2014


The Ancient Incident (Kabal American Zephyr), 1981

Shuffle makes available selections from the Rauschenberg Foundation art collection for exhibition in art institutions throughout the United States. Joining philanthropic initiative with the goal of nurturing the artist’s legacy, Shuffle loans are underwritten by the Foundation. Projects can range from a focused presentation of a single artwork to exhibitions of numerous works. Committed to audience development and new scholarship, the program seeks to connect with university and regional museums. Shuffle encourages dialogue with partnering institutions’ collections.

The program draws its name from Rauschenberg’s Synapsis Shuffle (1999), a painting comprised of fifty-two parts, as in a deck of cards. The work is realized when collaborators choose and assemble at least three and no more than seven panels, generating myriad variations. Every participant who arranges and re-arranges the parts is credited as a composer of the work. Past players include musician David Byrne, artist Chuck Close, choreographer Merce Cunningham, curator Walter Hopps, and gallerist Ileana Sonnabend.

In the spirit of its namesake, the program invites collaboration with partnering institutions to start conversations, continue arguments, and foster new perspectives. The proposition: take Rauschenberg’s works as inspiration, counterpoint, or at their most basic, as objects of contemplation and deep looking. Shuffle is both a tribute to the artist’s life and oeuvre as well as a venture to cultivate his public.

Please visit the newly launched website: shuffle.rauschenbergfoundation.org

Featuring the current exhibition, Rauschenberg: Collecting & Connecting, on view at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through January 11, 2015: shuffle.rauschenbergfoundation.org/exhibitions/nasher/

Rauschenberg: Collecting & Connecting presents a dialogue between selections from the Nasher Museum's collection and over thirty artworks on loan from the Rauschenberg Foundation.

Jul 7, 2014


Rauschenberg and curator Walter Hopps, installing Minutiae (1954) for the retrospective exhibition, Robert Rauschenberg, National Collection of Fine Arts, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 1976. Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni, www.gianfrancogorgoni.it

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation has partnered with Artsy to create an Emerging Curator Competition for graduate and undergraduate students world-wide.  Our objectives are to increase access to art and archival resources digitally; to create a program to benefit aspiring curators and their institutions; and to foster new scholarship. In keeping with that vision, the competition encourages a new generation of curators to use digital tools to bring new views and ideas to global audiences.  

The jury for the Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition is comprised of five renowned artists, curators, and scholars—John Elderfield, Branden Joseph, Shirin Neshat, Christopher Rauschenberg, and Sarah Roberts—who will evaluate exhibition proposals that are related to the work of Robert Rauschenberg either presented on its own or juxtaposed with the work of other artists and artworks. Participants will submit exhibition proposals on Artsy.net, choosing from images selected by the Rauschenberg Foundation and from the 40,000 images provided by Artsy’s 230 museum and institutional partners, including the British Museum, Fondation Beyeler, J. Paul Getty Trust, Guggenheim Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and others. In-depth research and archival materials will be accessible via the new Rauschenberg Foundation website and the SFMOMA Rauschenberg Research Project.  

In the spirit of Robert Rauschenberg, the jury seeks proposals that make unexpected connections and ponder new lines of questioning. In a career that spanned more than fifty years, Rauschenberg continually pushed the boundaries by using a multidisciplinary approach and defying expectation. His commitment to innovation and his fearless approach to art are characteristics that the jury will evaluate in the online exhibition proposals.

The judges will select three finalists whose proposals will be featured on both the Artsy.net and the Rauschenberg Foundation website and the winner will be selected by the general public through online voting. The winner will be awarded: 1) a letter of award signed by the panel of judges; 2) the winning curatorial proposal will be designed as an online exhibition on Artsy.net; and 3) a curatorial fellowship and honorarium enabling the winner to select works from the Rauschenberg Foundation Shuffle artwork lending library to curate an exhibition at the winner’s academic institution.

Central to the mission of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is fostering the legacy of the artist’s work and his long-term commitment to art education by providing broad public access to art. The foundation strives to encourage students and aspiring curators to actively engage with the work of Rauschenberg, his collaborators, and the artists who have been inspired by him. With the Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition, the foundation seeks to nurture Rauschenberg scholarship and to expand the study of art through current digital means. When the new Rauschenberg Foundation website launches in late summer, students, aspiring curators, and the general public will have unprecedented access and information on Rauschenberg’s artwork and archives.

Artsy (Artsy.net) is a free online resource for learning about and collecting art, and it will host the competition as part of its ongoing mission to increase education and public access to art from around the world.

Apr 30, 2014


Stop Side Early Winter Glut, 1987

New York—The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation today announced that six major museums across the United States have acquired nine works by artist Robert Rauschenberg through the foundation’s Gift/Purchase Program.

This one-year program was designed to expand public access to and awareness of the artist’s work by offering museums a rare opportunity to acquire artworks from the foundation’s holdings through equal parts gift and purchase.

“When Rauschenberg’s work transferred to the foundation, we committed ourselves to ensuring the broadest access possible to his art by helping to place works in museum collections,” said Christy MacLear, executive director of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. “These pieces represent the strength of Rauschenberg’s work in the 1970s and 1980s and further his legacy of continued artistic innovation. We could not be more pleased to have them acquired by some of America’s finest institutions.”

The six institutions that have acquired the artworks are:

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    • Bande de Sureté (Cardboard), 1971
    • Vow (Jammer), 1976
  • The Minneapolis Institute of Arts
    • Mexico / Park (ROCI), 1985
  • The Museum of Modern Art, New York
    • Nabisco Shredded Wheat (Cardboard), 1971
    • Gull (Jammer), 1976
    • Stop Side Early Winter Glut, 1987
  • The New Orleans Museum of Art
    • Melic Meeting (Spread), 1979
  • The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
    • Rosalie / Red Cheek / Temporary Letter / Stock (Cardboard), 1971
  • The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
    • Untitled (Venetian), 1973

The artworks acquired include key examples of some Rauschenberg’s most important series: Cardboards, Venetians, Jammers, Spreads, Gluts, and ROCI works. Created across two decades, these works exemplify the diversity of the artist’s materials and activities.

  • Cardboards investigate the aesthetic potential of a mundane material.
  • Venetians are a sculptural series evoking the atmosphere of the Italian city.
  • Jammers, inspired by a trip to India, celebrate the sensual qualities of fabric.
  • Spreads combine printed imagery and found objects in large-scale tableaux.
  • Gluts address the socioeconomic circumstances underlying the detritus used here as sculptural material.
  • Rauschenberg's humanitarian project ROCI (Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange) traveled to eleven countries from 1984 to 1991 to promote world peace through artistic dialogue with local cultures.

“Having worked with Rauschenberg and his art for more than thirty years,” said David White, senior curator for the foundation, “it is enormously gratifying that these six museums selected such representative works for their collections. An entirely new generation of museum visitors will have the opportunity to experience the breadth of Rauschenberg’s work as I have.”

In addition to the Gift/Purchase Program, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation has lent artworks to forty-six museums and exhibitions around the world; initiated a “Loan Bank” pilot program with two university museums that connect painting, sculpture, and performance-based artworks with curricula development; and donated more than a hundred works by other artists from Rauschenberg’s personal art collection to leading museums and cultural centers, including the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Walker Art Center, the National Gallery of Art, and the New York Public Library for Performing Arts.