Foundation

Jun 7, 2017


Residency 26 Artists

Visit the Artists-in-Residence page to learn more about this group of artists.

May 29, 2017


Timelapse video of the installation of A Quake in Paradise (Labyrinth) at MASS MoCA


Rauschenberg’s A Quake in Paradise (Labyrinth) will be on view at MASS MoCA from May 28, 2017–May 26, 2018. This site specific work invites viewers to move through — and become a part of — a maze-like installation of panels. This will be the first time the work is on view in over a decade. It is shown in tandem with The Lurid Attack of the Monsters from the Postal News Aug 1875, a work from the Kabal American Zephyr series, which was inspired by the macabre work of nineteenth-century Japanese woodblock printmaker Tsukioka Yoshitoshi.

Mar 20, 2017


In summer 2017, the Archives will launch a Rauschenberg research travel fund, a new opportunity that will provide partial support for costs related to travel and living expenses that scholars may incur in order to do research at the Rauschenberg Foundation and its Archives.

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY


The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation will provide one-time project-based support to scholars, academics, artists, and other researchers who can demonstrate a compelling need to use the archival materials onsite at the Foundation. To be eligible, applicants must:

  • reside 50 miles or more away from the Foundation;
  • not have received a grant or other funding from the Foundation in the past 3 years;
  • be at the graduate level and above.

The application will be open to U.S.-based and international individuals. Please note, priority will be given to independent researchers or those affiliated with institutions with limited resources.

ELIGIBLE EXPENSES


The Rauschenberg research travel fund will provide partial support for research costs and can range from $200 - $2,000, depending on travel distance. Examples of eligible costs include:

  • Travel costs including airfare and local transit
  • Living expenses while researching including hotel and meals

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS


Applications will open in summer 2017. Interested individuals can email archives@rauschenbergfoundation.org to request to be notified when application is available.

Mar 19, 2017


Photo: Courtesy Williams College Museum of Art


Robert Rauschenberg: Autobiography brings together 26 original works of art with 56 archival objects primarily on loan from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation and centers on the artist’s monumental print, Autobiography, 1968. The exhibition will be on view at WCMA from March 17 through August 20, 2017.

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation has been processing the artist’s archives over the last two years and recently made them fully accessible to scholars. The  Foundation’s “Shuffle” program facilitates collaborations with college and university museums, in which works from the Foundation’s art collection are made available for exhibition and study. The WCMA project is the first ever to mine the archives for an exhibition and a college course. In the Art History/Museum class, Robert Rauschenberg Art, Archives and Exhibitions, developed and led by professor of art C. Ondine Chavoya and curator of contemporary art Lisa Dorin, Williams students researched the artist’s life, work, and the often blurry lines between the two. The students studied the history and theory of archives and how exhibitions make use of them, and spent two full days in the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives in New York working closely with Francine Snyder, the Foundation’s director of archives and scholarship.

Read more about the exhibition > 

Feb 27, 2017


The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation announced today the selection of Russell Reynolds Associates to conduct the search for the Foundation’s next executive director, following the departure of Christy MacLear in December 2016. Russell Reynolds is one of the premier executive search firms and a leader in high-profile searches for arts-related institutions, including artist foundations, museums, and similar non-profits.

Christopher Rauschenberg, chairman and president of the Foundation’s Board of Directors, said: “We are highly enthusiastic and energized as the Foundation enters this next chapter in its development.  The Foundation’s Board of Directors look forward to working with the Russell Reynolds team of Laurie Nash, Katherine Armstrong, and Emily Rafferty as we engage in a wide-ranging and inclusive search.  This transition comes at a strong moment for us:  The Foundation is in the midst of a series of major retrospectives in London, New York, and San Francisco sharing Bob’s art and life with a globally expanding public, while also launching educational and philanthropic initiatives that we believe are needed now more than ever before.  We are therefore fully confident of attracting someone strongly committed to lead the Foundation as we continue to build upon and advance my father’s artistic and philanthropic vision and ideals.”

Dec 1, 2016


Rauschenberg with transfer drawings by Jasper Johns

 


Robert Rauschenberg presents a holistic and multifaceted overview of the artist’s prolific career. In addition to key examples from Rauschenberg’s iconic “Combines” series, the exhibition showcases the artist’s innovative experiments with media appropriation, technology, and performance, as well as the global impact of his career, particularly through his close partnerships with artists across Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

Tate Modern’s presentation begins with an examination of Rauschenberg’s early works, which were largely influenced by his formative years at Black Mountain College, North Carolina, a hub of artistic innovation and experimental practice in the 1940’s and early 50’s. During this period, Rauschenberg first experimented with photography and performance, created the monolithic White Paintings (1951), and incorporated found materialsand media images into his solvent transfer drawings.

The retrospective also highlights and explore Rauschenberg’s work in performance, which was at the core of much of his artistic output. His involvement with performance began with his participation, alongside choreographer Merce Cunningham, in composer John Cage’s Theatre Piece #1 at Black Mountain College in 1952. Throughout his career, Rauschenberg not only designed sets, costumes, and lighting for Cunningham and other choreographers such as Trisha Brown and Paul Taylor, but he also performed and choreographed his own works such as Pelican in 1963, and Elgin Tie in 1964.

By 1970, Rauschenberg left New York and established a home and studio on Captiva Island, Florida, which would become his primary residence until his death in 2008. He continued to work until the end of his life, producing historically significant works throughout his mid- to late career, including the Cardboards, 1971-72, Jammers, 1975- 76; Gluts, 1986-94; and Anagrams, 1995–97. Robert Rauschenberg at Tate Modern culminates with works from these later series, as well as ephemera from the Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI) – a project in which Rauschenberg traveled to ten countries outside the U.S. to collaborate with local artists in each region. ROCI became Rauschenberg’s primary preoccupation between 1984 and 1991 and was a tangible expression of his belief in art as a catalyst for global dialogue. Mounting an exhibition of his work in each country – often where freedom of speech and artistic expression had been suppressed – Rauschenberg’s aim was to inspire crosscultural exchanges and achieve a mutual understanding through art.

 

Sep 19, 2016


2016 Artist as Activist Fellow Favianna Rodriguez 


Today we announce the open call for the Artist as Activist Fellowship. We invite creative professionals who use their practice to address the intersecting issues of racial justice and mass incarceration to seek up to $100,000 in support. Deadline to apply is December 7, 2016.

2015 was a remarkable year for Criminal Justice reform. From extensive media coverage to the passage of a national bill that limits mandatory sentences for nonviolent offenders, advocates who have worked tirelessly to end mass incarceration saw reform at the forefront of national conversation, illuminating the challenges and pitfalls of a system that has 25 percent of the world’s known prisoners, but only 5 percent of the global population –a disproportionate number of whom are black and brown. How can artists and creative professionals support this momentum and highlight the need for further and more aggressive reform on issues such as, but not limited to, immigrant detention, policing, and the privatization of prisons?

To learn more about this opportunity visit the How To Apply page >

Read more about the current Fellows working on mass incarceration >

Jul 5, 2016


From top left, clockwise: Blair Katherine Betik, Qiong (Voyo) Wu, Natalia Gabrielsen, Lauren Blankenship and Mekia “Machine” Denby.


We are pleased today to announce the winners of This Art Is Your Art, an online competition that invited graduate and undergraduate students in the United States to create videos responding to works of art in the White House. The competition was hosted by the White House Historical Association, Artsy and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

A panel of eight renowned artists, educators, museum professionals and public figures judged the videos created by the students. The winners were selected on the basis of the creativity, relevancy and production value of their projects:

  • Blair Katherine Betik, Southern Methodist University, Class of 2018, from Ennis, TX for her video on Albert Bierstadt’s Rocky Mountain Landscape (1870)
  • Lauren Blankenship, Portland State University, Class of 2017, from Portland, OR for her video on Georgia O’Keeffe’s Mountain at Bear Lake – Taos (1930)
  • Mekia “Machine” Denby, Columbia University, Class of 2018, from New York, NY for her video on Alma Thomas’ Resurrection (1966)
  • Natalia Gabrielsen, University of Arizona Graduate School, Class of 2017, from Tucson, AZ for her video on O’Keeffe’s painting
  • Qiong “Voyo” Wu, Sotheby’s Graduate School, Class of 2017, from New York, NY for her video on Robert Rauschenberg’s Early Bloomer [Anagram (A Pun)] (1998)

The winning videos will be on display at the White House Visitor Center, in a special installation organized by the Rauschenberg Foundation and the White House Historical Association, from July 15 to September 30, 2016.

Watch the winning videos for This Art is Your Art >

Read the full story >

 

 

Jun 29, 2016


Los Angeles Poverty Department (LAPD), "Chasing Monsters from Under the Bed," 2015. A performance addressing police violence and mental illness. Photo: LAPD


Today we announced the ten artists and artist collectives selected for the 2016 Artist as Activist Fellowship—the Foundation’s two-year grant program designed to support independent artists and artist collectives who tackle important social challenges through their creative practice.  

With 2.2 million people currently in U.S. prisons or jails, the growth rates of this industry combined with the disproportionate number of people of color locked up, mass incarceration is one of the most pressing issues of our time. The Rauschenberg Foundation believes that artists are key partners in addressing these issues, and generating lasting social, political, and economic change.

The Foundation identified this year’s cohort through a competitive, nationwide call for proposals to U.S.-based artists. From an initial pool of 228, the following ten artists and artist collectives were selected to receive support ranging from $50,000 - $100,000 over two years:  

Maria Gaspar, Chicago

The Graduates, Louisiana

Titus Kaphar, New York City and New Haven

Los Angeles Poverty Department, Los Angeles

Jeremy Robins/Echoes of Incarceration, Brooklyn

Favianna Rodriguez, Oakland

Paul Rucker, Baltimore and Seattle

El Sawyer, Philadelphia

jackie sumell, New Orleans

Shontina Vernon, Seattle

Through various mediums such as film, performance, radio, public art, music, and theater, the 2016 Artist as Activist Fellows—many of whom have been previously incarcerated or impacted by the prison system—will share the stories and experiences of people directly affected by mass incarceration, and will each develop projects that address the intersections between race, class, and mass incarceration.

Join the conversation on art, activism, and mass incarceration with the Foundation via Twitter {@RRauschenberg }, Facebook {@RauschenbergFoundation }, and on Instagram {@rauschenbergfoundation } with the hashtags #ArtistasActivist, #RRgrants, and #RauschenbergFoundation.

Read the official announcement > 
Learn more about Artist as Activist >

 

Feb 29, 2016


Rauschenberg at Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles, 1969. Photo: Sidney B. Felsen © 1969; Rauschenberg's Collection, 1954.


We are pleased to announce a new Fair Use policy- the first to be adopted by an artist-endowed foundation–that will make images of Rauschenberg's artwork more accessible to museums, scholars, artists, and the public.

This new policy comes at an important moment for image rights, as more institutions are providing free and open access to their archives and digitized collections. Prior to 2015, the Rauschenberg Foundation, like many artist foundations and estates, safeguarded the use of images through licensing agents. Over time, the Foundation observed that the fear of violating copyright restrictions resulted in two unique challenges. First, due to the prohibitive costs associated with rights and licensing, many scholars and professors limit themselves to using freely available images in their lectures, presentations, and publications, which in turn can alter how art history itself is written and taught. Additionally, image licensing hinders the conversion of print publications to digital formats, due to the costs of obtaining rights for a second time.

Furthermore, given the costs and complexities around using images online and on social media, museums and other institutions are limited in the types of images they can post to their channels. As a result, individual users, not institutions, generate many images of artworks that exist in the digital realm. A lack of “official” images with correct captions and attributions leads to the perpetuation of incorrect information online and on social media.

In order to address these challenges and the changing landscape of image rights, the Foundation issued pilot licenses to a select group of museums in 2015, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), and the Tate Modern.

Inspired by the increased use of Rauschenberg artwork images as a result of this pilot license to museums, the Rauschenberg Foundation has decided to expand its Fair Use policy to the public at large.

Read the full Fair Use policy >

Read more in The New York Times >

Feb 9, 2016


Rauschenberg working on The 1/4 Mile or 2 Furlong Piece (1981–98) in his Laika Lane studio, Captiva, Florida, ca. 1983. Photo: Attributed to Terry Van Brunt

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is delighted to announce that the artist's The 1/4 Mile or 2 Furlong Piece (1981–98) will be shown at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing from June 12–August 21, 2016. Comprised of approximately 190 parts and stretching over 1,500 feet, this work has been described as a self-contained retrospective, referring to significant developments throughout Rauschenberg's career.

While it will be the first time this monumental artwork has been seen in Asia, it is thirty years since Rauschenberg’s ROCI CHINA was presented at the National Art Gallery, Beijing. The artist first conceived of the Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI) while collaborating with master papermakers in Jingxian in 1982. A multi-year international project, ROCI aimed to foster cross-cultural understanding through art.

Read Press Release >

Read more in The Art Newspaper >

Dec 22, 2015


Shirin Neshat, Ghada and Sayed, 2013. Images courtesy Gladstone Gallery


With support from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Shirin Neshat created a series of portraits titled Our House is On Firea project that explored Egypt in the aftermath of the Arab Spring. The foundation is donating two limited edition prints from this series to thirty-three colleges and universities around the world.

​“Neshat's project embodies Rauschenberg’s own belief that art could change the dialogue for challenging international issues,” said Christy MacLear, executive director of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. “Our goal with this donation is to encourage dialogue about the portraits’ artistic, cultural, and political value while also creating an opportunity for academic departments to collaborate with school museums and galleries.”

The selected institutions submitted proposals on how they would incorporate the portraits into their curriculum in a way that was committed to using them to foster challenging conversations on a range of issues. A few innovative ideas include displaying the prints in Columbia Law School and using them as case studies for human rights issues, and hosting a panel discussion on Christianity, Islam, and Judaism at University of Pennsylvania.

See the full list of recipients >

Sep 10, 2015


Rauschenberg and a Tibetan official at the opening ceremony for ROCI TIBET, Revolutionary Exhibition Hall, Lhasa, December 5, 1985. Photo: Thomas Buehler

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Artsy, and Nicole Bray, the 2015 winner of the Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition, invite students enrolled at accredited institutions to submit artworks to be considered for inclusion in the inaugural Emerging Curator exhibition. The ROCI Road to Peace: Experiments in the Unfamiliar is inspired by the ethos of the original Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange (ROCI, 1984–91)—to foster understanding and promote peace through art. The exhibition will be held at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, Maryland from December 5, 2015 – March 6, 2016 and will complement a related exhibition, Robert Rauschenberg: ROCI Works from the National Gallery, curated by Anke Van Wagenberg. The concurrent exhibition will include iconic works by Rauschenberg taken from the ROCI series, which have been graciously loaned by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

With his ROCI project, Rauschenberg traveled to ten nations around the world—Chile, China, Cuba, East Germany, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, the Soviet Union, Tibet, and Venezuela. Exploring diverse cultural traditions, new materials, and local artistic practices, Rauschenberg used his art to shine a light on the commonalities and differences of human experience. The original intentions advocated by ROCI are as relevant today as they were in 1984—to share, understand, and celebrate difference. In the words of Rauschenberg, "a one-to-one contact through art contains potent peaceful powers." The ROCI Road to Peace: Experiments in the Unfamiliar will explore what a modern day ROCI might look like in today’s social, political, and technological landscape.

For more information and submission instructions, please visit artsy.net/emergingcurator. Submissions will be accepted from September 10 through September 24, 2015.

Jun 15, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 13 artists

Jun 1, 2015


The Rising Waters Confab Open Studio, May 27, 2015


The Rising Waters Confab, held at the Rauschenberg Residency (April 27–May 29, 2015), was inspired by Robert Rauschenberg’s lifelong belief in the power of collaboration and the potential for art to bring about positive social change. To address climate change, the most pressing concern of our time, the Rising Waters Confab convened an interdisciplinary group of creative thinkers, including artists, scientists, activists, educators, and island dwellers at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Island, Florida. Rising Waters Confab is the first time that the residency has been dedicated to a single theme.

During the five-week immersion, participants differed widely in their approach, background, and knowledge but were equal in their dedication to addressing climate change. “Confabbing”—or meeting, sharing meals, exploring the local environs, and making art—resulted in provocative and powerful collaborations and reflected a shared commitment to the issue. The Confab culminated in an Open Studio (May 27, 2015) when the public was invited to meet with the participants to view their individual and collaborative works in process. 

Rising Waters Confab was organized by Buster Simpson, Laura Sindell, and Anne Focke. Each of the twenty participants provided an invaluable contribution and made an inimitable imprint on the experience and the outcome of the residency. 

May 21, 2015


Fort Myers, Florida, 1980 (detail)


After a highly competitive process, in which nearly 500 organizations applied to the foundation’s call for proposals, nine organizations have been identified to receive support through the Climate Change Solutions Fund. Grant amounts range from $50,000 to $100,000 over two years for projects taking place in four countries: Micronesia, Peru, the United States, and Zambia.

From native seed collection and documenting the stories of Arizona farmers to developing a primer for artist-driven climate activism worldwide, the nine grantees represent a diverse collection of strategies for addressing global warming, each engaging with local and regional communities in ways that leverage cultural traditions and creative practices. 

To learn more about the inaugural grantees of the Climate Change Solutions Fund, please visit the Grants section of our website.  

Apr 22, 2015


Earth Day, 1970


The protection of the planet has been central to the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation’s mission since its founding by the artist in 1990. In 1991, through the sale of an edition and poster designed by Rauschenberg, the foundation raised  funds and greater awareness for the Earth Pledge that was announced at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) that same year. The foundation continues to uphold that original pledge “to make the earth a secure and hospitable home for present and future generations.”

For the next thirty days, in celebration of the forty-fifth anniversary of Earth Day, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation will highlight some of the grants and programs that extend the artist’s legacy as a champion of the environment. You can join the conversation by following the foundation on Twitter and Facebook. News items include:

Today the foundation is announcing $250,000 in grants to agencies working in Southwest Florida, including a grant to the Sanibel Captiva Conservation Fund, which focuses much of its work on the preservation of Florida’s fragile wetlands and other ecosystems. All of the awardees were identified through a partnership with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation to advance social innovation in the region. Southwest Florida is an area where Rauschenberg lived and worked for forty years and a place of ongoing investment for the foundation. To learn more about this partnership and the $250,000 in grants, you can read more here.

You can also read the newly posted Art in Context to learn more about Rauschenberg’s commitment to the environment in his art and activities. Among the highlighted artworks is Rauschenberg’s Earth Day poster, created for the first annual Earth Day on April 22, 1970, to benefit the American Environment Foundation in Washington, D.C. The poster is the first of many editioned works that the artist produced to support the social and political causes most important to him.

This Monday, April 27, 2015, will mark the beginning of a month-long gathering of artists, scientists, engineers, and activists at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Island, Florida. Entitled Rising Waters Confab, the meeting aims to spark new thinking and to influence civic will toward finding and spreading solutions for the rising waters of climate change. Participants will contribute to a blog that captures key themes and ideas.

Over the next month, the foundation will share more highlights of its work to support a healthy, sustainable planet, including announcing the inaugural grantees of its Climate Change Solutions Fund, a new initiative that spurs the use of cultural and civic engagement to advance solutions to global warming.  

Apr 17, 2015


Photos: Sage Sohier


During his residency, Tijuana-based artist Marcos Ramirez printed the front page of a different international newspaper each day for thirty-three days and screen-printed imagery that he had photographed around Captiva. Later, he will add text to create a personal journal that is juxtaposed against his worldview. Inspired by Rauschenberg’s legacy of printmaking and collage, Ramirez chose to integrate similar techniques into his work during the residency.

Other artists in Residency 11 were also influenced by the ways in which Rauschenberg worked. David Martine and Shawne Major experimented with screen printing with their individual art practices; Martine created three murals as he worked directly in Rauschenberg’s former studio, and which enabled him to step back in time to imagine Rauschenberg’s experimentation process; and Major also found the residency invigorating and plans to incorporate Rauschenberg’s methods into her next mixed-media works.

Catherine Chalmers arrived in Captiva with the idea to make screen prints but found it led to something else: “I brought several images for this purpose and when printing them into black and white and adding one color during the preparation, I inadvertently discovered an exciting way to create digital paintings. Although this finding led me away from making screen prints, I would not have discovered this new process without trying to manipulate the images for the screen. I am completely thrilled to have found a new method in which to work with my vast and beloved body of photographs.”

James Leary came to the residency in early March with a plan to complete the first draft of a screenplay, which he achieved. Yet two unforeseen projects also emerged: A series of 300 drawings and what turned out to be, in his words, “a complete surprise,” learning the process to create cyanotypes and executing a series of prints in collaboration with the art critic Charlie Schultz. Schultz also completed a writing project on photography and industry in America.

Photographers Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun finally found the time to print their Kodachrome slides that had been waterlogged during Hurricane Katrina, and which they had kept in a freezer that was found on the street to preserve them.

Two artists during the residency used elements that had washed ashore. Diane Schenandoah sculpted driftwood and wood from Australian pine and Sea Grape trees. Charles Lindsay used the carcasses of horseshoe crabs in a sculpture piece for an upcoming exhibition. He noted, “The re-discovery of horseshoe crabs is significant by adding a perfect symbol species to the part of my artistic mission that considers nonhuman intelligence and vast time scales. My challenge continues to be about bringing nature, technology, and the nature of existence into the contemporary art domain. The pace and arc of this project speaks well to adaptation and to responding to a location and situation, which is a high compliment to the residency itself.”

Apr 14, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about Residency 12 and Rising Waters Confab.  

Mar 8, 2015


Photo: Attributed to Steve Paxton


After a highly competitive process, in which more than 600 artists applied to the foundation’s call for proposals, the inaugural cohort of Artist as Activist Fellows, as well as Travel and Research Grantees, has been selected. Four artists and two artist collectives will receive direct grants ranging from $30,000 to $100,000 over two years, along with access to opportunities for professional development. Additionally, nine other socially engaged artists will receive grants ranging from $2,500 to $8,500 to pursue opportunities for travel and/or research related to their activist practice. All told by the first half of 2015, the Rauschenberg Foundation will have invested $650,000 in fifteen independent artists and collectives applying their creative practice to the public sphere, along with ten organizations that are exemplary pioneers in supporting artists who work this way.

You can learn more about the Artist as Activist program’s Two-Year Fellows or the Travel and Research Grantees by visiting the Grants section of our website. To read the press release click here.

Feb 26, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 11 artists.

Feb 12, 2015


Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Executive Director Christy MacLear joined First Lady Michelle Obama at the White House on Tuesday, February 10, to celebrate the installation of Rauschenberg’s Early Bloomer [Anagram (A Pun)]1998. Also included in the White House Dining Room are works by artists Anni Albers, Josef Albers, and Alma Thomas. The installation is now open to the public

This work, part of a series Rauschenberg made using digital color transfers, was donated in honor of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation in 2011. It was first unveiled during the Celebration of American Art presentation, hosted by Michelle Obama at the White House on June 5, 2013. Early Bloomer [Anagram (A Pun)] is one of the first works of contemporary art to be displayed in the public rooms of the White House. 

Also on Tuesday, former Vice President Walter Mondale attended the Open Studio at the Rauschenberg Residency on Captiva Island, Florida. During his visit to the residency, Mondale enjoyed presentations by vocalist Somi, musician Hervé Samb, performance artist Laurie Anderson, and actor Cheryl Lynn Bruce, and he viewed works by visual artists Manal AlDowayan, Kim Faler, Ann Hamilton, Brad Kahlhamer, Mario Martinez, and Carrie Mae Weems.

Jan 28, 2015



Visit the Artists in Residence page to learn about the Residency 10 artists. 

Jan 15, 2015


Photos: Sage Sohier

Once the home of the Calusa Indian tribe and then two centuries later, a fishing destination for Theodore Roosevelt and Thomas Edison, Captiva Island, Florida, now boasts luxury homes on a street nicknamed the “Gold Coast.” But the enchantment of the land that Robert Rauschenberg embraced for forty years remains and is invigorated by the newest, and perhaps most itinerant, visitors to the island, the artists in residence at the Rauschenberg Residency. And so what does this small cohort of artists do for thirty-three days on this island in the Gulf of Mexico?
 
“I was able to work on thirty-five paintings and experiment with different surfaces instead of canvas (muslin, plastic, plexi). I experimented with different forms of hanging, suspending work from the ceiling like stretched cowhide or suspended from a point (this technique also allowed me to consider installation work more effectively than I am usually able to in my studio). The last five paintings at the residency incorporated plastic/drop cloth from the floor and allowed me to begin a dialogue between painting and performance,” wrote Gage Peer (Santa Fe). And did this differ from his original intention? “I did plan to work with painting, but the amount of work and the introduction of these materials and how they would change my painting process was not planned.”
 
For many, the experience transcends initial aspirations. “I accomplished so much . . . above and beyond my expectations!” wrote Laurie Lambrecht (Bridgehampton, NY), and so, too, for David Francis (Minneapolis), “The pace and depth of work on my memoir was far beyond my expectations that I remain flabbergasted.”
 
The plan is often best left behind, as Douglas Coupland (Vancouver) noted, “I think that if I arrived with a definite idea in my head and only worked on that idea, it would defeat the spell of the place.” The residency experience has also proven to be a trigger. “When I got home I had a creative explosion that could never have happened if not for the ideas from RR and their incubation there.”
 
Another artist, Brighde Mullins (Los Angeles), wrote afterward, “To be in a place where nature is still in charge was a huge influence. I felt like I had a different experience of time because of the proximity to the water and the plants and animals. Being on Captiva was a daily lesson in humility and in the finite capacity of humans. Being in Bob’s World was inspiring and calming. I remembered that I used to draw and paint and make collages of my play worlds (I’m primarily a playwright), and being around his work and his spirit reconnected me to the multidimensional aspect of creating a character.”
 
Collaborations took place slowly and organically. As Keith Sklar (Chicago) listed in his follow-up evaluation: “Experiments with residency staff Matt, Carrell, and Maria in silkscreen. Exploration of digital printing and Photoshop with Carrell and Ehren. An improvised performance with musician David Ornette Cherry and painter Gage Peer. Planned possible series of public artworks in collaboration with Dorit Cypis and Brighde Mullins, based on Brighde’s work on Phyllis Wheatley. Discussions and critiques of a range of residents’ art practices and ideas throughout the residency.”
 
The community was engaged, as well, through an outreach where the two musicians, David Ornette Cherry (Portland, OR) and Colin Gilmore (Austin) performed for 160 elementary school students at Sanibel School. Later the same day, an Open Studio was held in the Main Studio at the residency for fifty community members.
 
And there was time for other kinds of work, too, as Dorit Cypis noted. “Resting, listening, biking, dreaming, reflecting, questioning, sharing, communing, exploring, experimenting, recognizing others, recognizing myself, writing, wandering, wondering, walking, boating, beaching, bird watching, eating.”
 
The influence of Robert Rauschenberg pervades the residency as Mary Ellen Carroll (New York) reflected, “I thanked him constantly as he and his legacy made it possible to be there and to work as an artist. To have the people and equipment and facilities to realize 500 silkscreens and digital prints and paintings. . . .”
 
“I look forward to the months ahead to absorb and utilize the inspiration and ideas,” Laurie Lambrecht wrote, summing up the residency experience. “I learned much about myself; it was a time of growth.”

Jan 8, 2015


Renaissance Club begins planning a new project. Photo: Joe Rubino

The Lab School of Washington, with support from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, presents The Power of Art Conference, April 16–18, 2015: This is Your Brain on Arts.

In its twenty-first year, the conference includes a town hall with national voices in the arts, a day of workshops led by teaching artists at The Lab School, a fully arts-based school for students with learning differences, and workshops at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Participants will learn how to advocate for the arts, integrate the arts into core courses, and incorporate new practices into their teaching. The Lab School will provide for the programming costs for the three days, hotel accommodations, and meals. Admission to the conference is competitive and limited to forty visual and performing arts educators across the United States. Applications are open now through February 1, 2015.

Click here for more info and to apply.

For information about RRF’s history of support for The Lab School and The Power of Art Conference, click here.

Dec 8, 2014


Caryatid Cavalcade I / ROCI CHILE, 1985

Caryatid Cavalcade I / ROCI CHILE, 1985

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, in partnership with Artsy is pleased to announce that Nicole Bray, a student at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art, has won the inaugural Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition. With support from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Bray will receive a fellowship to mount a Rauschenberg exhibition in New York.

Bray’s winning proposal was inspired by the Rauschenberg Overseas Cultural Interchange (ROCI) project, which she argues remains as relevant today as when Rauschenberg first conceived of it in 1984. Click here to learn more about ROCI.

Read full press release

Dec 5, 2014


SEED Summit 2014


Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Hosts Grantees on Its Captiva Campus
Eighty-five nonprofit professionals from across the country join together at historic island residence

Beginning November 3, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation used its Captiva Campus to host eighty-five artists, entrepreneurs, community organizers, and social innovators from across the United States, and who have received support through the foundation’s SEED Grant program. The inaugural SEED Summit, which is intended to become an annual event at Captiva, brought these arts professionals together for a one week meeting to build skills, share knowledge, and form ongoing relationships. 

Download Full Press Release

Nov 25, 2014


Photo: © The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Courtesy Art + Commerce

We are pleased to announce the appointment of Francine Snyder as the Foundation’s first Senior Archivist. This inaugural position builds upon the newly launched website to make Rauschenberg's archives accessible to students, scholars, and the public. Snyder will be integral in providing materials for the future Rauschenberg catalogue raisonné. In addition, she will be responsible for establishing educational partnerships globally, identifying future grants for archival scholarship, and collaborating with other artists’ archives. Previously, Snyder was the Director of the Library and Archives at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Earlier this year, she was selected for the 2014 Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) and has written widely on archives and technology.

Nov 11, 2014


Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni

VOTE NOW for your favorite exhibition proposal! Follow @Artsy on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Google+ and like/share/comment on posts to vote. You can also share your favorite proposal on social media with #EmergingCurator.

Finalists' posts are now featured on artsy.net/emergingcurator.

The Finalists


Paisid Aramphongphan, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Nicole Bray, Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York
Grant Johnson, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Nefertari Juarez Aguilar, Centro de Cultura Casa Lamm, Mexico City
 

In collaboration with curators from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, the winner will have the opportunity to curate an exhibition at their campus art gallery with artworks from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation collection. The panel of judges includes John Elderfield, Branden W. Joseph, Shirin Neshat, Christopher Rauschenberg, and Sarah Roberts, who determined the four finalists. The winner is chosen by you. Voting ends November 18, 2014 11:59 pm EST (Eastern Standard Time). 

Artsy received 138 thought-provoking exhibition proposals from four continents, 22 countries, and 78 cities, such as Buenos Aires, Hong Kong, London, Melbourne, Mexico City, Milan, Moscow, and more. It was a tough decision for the judges to choose the finalists, and we would like to recognize seven exceptional proposals as Honorable Mentions. Congratulations to all of the students for participating!

Honorable Mentions 


Minnie Atairu (George Washington University, Washington, D.C.)
Caroline Barnett (New York University, Institute of Fine Arts)
Ashley Duhrkoop (Columbia University, New York)
Megan Govin (Pratt Institute, New York)
Manuela Reyes (School of Visual Arts, New York)
Oliver Shultz (Stanford University, California)
Nina Wexelblatt (Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts)
 

Nov 10, 2014


Photo: © The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Courtesy Art + Commerce

New Grant Program, Calls for Proposals Addressing Climate Change 


The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation announced today the creation of the Climate Change Solutions Fund to support cross-disciplinary responses to global warming, issuing an open call for grant proposals from organizations whose work matches the Fund’s objectives.

The Climate Change Solutions Fund pushes back against the “doom and gloom” narrative that emphasizes impending disaster or frames the scale of the problem as insurmountable. Instead the new grant program seeks projects that facilitate new, sustainable ways of being and living. That may translate into pragmatic tactics like advancing alternative energy sources or it may be more adaptive strategies like developing new economic systems. For more information about the grant’s guidelines and requirements, including how to register for an application webinar, visit our Apply Now page

Projects of particular interest are those that apply a systemic lens to the root causes of global warming; enroll the leadership of frontline communities most vulnerable to the impact of climate change; push for broad based civic engagement and community action; and wherever possible leverage the value artists and culture bearers bring to processes for devising and deploying practical solutions to this global crisis.

Read full press release

Oct 28, 2014


Rauschenberg returning to his studio after a junkyard trip. Captiva, Florida, 1982

For nearly forty years, Robert Rauschenberg maintained a home and studio in Captiva, Florida. More recently, the foundation has sustained a commitment to the region by converting those facilities into a dynamic artist residency program, as well as by making a number of grants to area non-profit organizations. In fact, since 2012 the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation has invested approximately $3.2 million into the local economy of Southwest Florida (not including grants). It is in this spirit that the foundation recently announced a partnership with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation to resource local non-profits who are working to improve the quality of life of Southwest Florida residents. Today marks the launch of that new grant program. Interested applicants can learn more by visiting www.floridacommunity.com or contacting Jacqueline Ehlers at JEhlers@floridacommunity.com or by phone at 239-274-5900.  

Oct 23, 2014


Aqua Fanfare (Urban Bourbon), 1993, acrylic on copper and mirrored aluminum, 72 13/16 x 48 13/16 inches (184.9 x 124 cm). 

456 North Camden Drive
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
November 1–December 13, 2014
 

I like seeing people using materials that one’s not accustomed to seeing in art. That has a particular value. New materials have fresh associations, physical properties and qualities that have built into them the possibility of forcing you or helping you do something else.
—Robert Rauschenberg

In collaboration with the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, Gagosian Beverly Hills is pleased to announce an exhibition of Robert Rauschenberg’s works on metal of the 1980s and 1990s. This will be the first major presentation of his work on the West Coast since MOCA’s acclaimed traveling exhibition of the Combines in 2006.

Rauschenberg’s protean outlook ushered in a new era of postwar American art in the wake of Abstract Expressionism with a free and experimental approach that drew inspiration from conceptual, materialist, and gestural precedents. His inventive use of discarded materials and appropriated images eviscerated distinctions between medium and genre, abstraction and representation, while his “flatbed picture plane,” which absorbed found objects into the realm of paintings, forever changed the relationship between artwork and viewer.

“Works on Metal” traces Rauschenberg’s obsession, beginning in the mid-1980s, with the potential of metal. Exchanging canvas for flat sheets of metal mounted directly to the wall, he worked in consequent series using aluminum, brass, copper, and bronze, harnessing the natural hues and reflections of each. He then juxtaposed their intrinsic qualities with secondary processes, from the application of acrylic and enamel paints and silkscreened photographic images to his fine-tuning of chemical reactions and manipulation of industrial scrap and refuse.

For his prescient project of global diplomacy known as ROCI (Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange, 1984–91), Rauschenberg worked and exhibited in eleven countries including Chile and Cuba, silkscreening photographic images taken during his extensive travels onto huge sheets of copper and stainless steel. Drawing upon this bountiful image bank, his ongoing investigation of painting on metal would prove to be one of the most inventive periods of his career, taking on ever new inflections as he traveled to Mexico, Germany, Tibet, the former U.S.S.R., Venezuela, and other locations. In the Urban Bourbon series (1988–96), reflective depths overlap with fragmented photography and gestural brushwork; in the Borealis paintings (1988–92), chemicals and ammonium salts were applied to brass, copper, and bronze sheets to achieve corrosive effects; in the steely Night Shades (1991), acids were used to rapidly tarnish the mirrored and brushed aluminum surfaces.

Parallel to his works on flat metal surfaces, Rauschenberg collected discarded automotive parts, gas station signs, and other scrap materials, which he manipulated into both freestanding and wall-mounted sculptures; the so-called Gluts (1986–89/1991–94) echoed the Combines in their reconfiguration of found objects. Rauschenberg referred to the Gluts, which he continued to produce after the seven-year ROCI. tour, as “souvenirs without nostalgia;” he aimed to create art that was “as fresh, strange and unpredictable as what’s going on around you.” In the conceptual and material breadth of the metal works, Rauschenberg fulfilled the partial relinquishing of authorship, allowing art to integrate with the mess of life.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by Joachim Pissarro.

Oct 22, 2014


Untitled (Tablet Series), 1974, Embossed paper, and cardboard, 31 1/4 x 22 3/8 inches (79.4 x 56.8 cm)

18 E 77th Street
New York 
October 9–December 20, 2014
 

Castelli Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Robert Rauschenberg. A Visual Lexicon. The exhibition includes work that spans the entire career of the artist, dating from 1959 to 2008 and realized in a variety of media. When viewed individually the works appear to be very different from each other; however, in reality they share a visual language unique to the work of Robert Rauschenberg. 

Rauschenberg adopted, and gradually allowed to reappear, many photographic sources for his work; Rosalind Krauss in 1997 brilliantly described these visual sources as Rauschenberg’s “perpetual inventory.” Just as important to the repetition and arrangement of the silk-screened and collaged imagery is the playful juxtaposition of their placement, whether set one next to the other or, occasionally, one above the other. The combined effort of selecting images and juxtaposing and layering them reveals the artist’s perception of the work, and a single artwork may become like a diary of a day in the life of the artist.

Included in the exhibition is Untitled, a combine of a pocket watch, chain, and tin can created circa 1959, whose components are retranslated in other works throughout the show. Solvent transfers and collages on cloth and paper from the 1970s, including work from the Hoarfrost Series, offer a wider glimpse into the artist’s personal relationship to his materials and his interest in the temporality of combined images. The most physically imposing work in the show, at more than seven feet tall and 21 feet wide, Arcadian Survey (Spread), 1977, continues the familiar thread of visual repetition but introduces mirrored panels, an element that further contributes to the idea of duplicating and possibly multiplying the same image again and again. The white, collaged fabric panel in this multidimensional work echoes three works created as part of the Tablet Series in 1974, in which pieces of cardboard are sandwiched between layers of white paper in such a way that we may only perceive them through the changing textures of the surface. The most recent work in the exhibition is Untitled, 2008, a patinated and painted bronze sculpture of a ruler balanced upon a ball of twine. The juxtaposition of the materials of this work reinforces the artist’s interest in creating a conflict through which something ethereal may emerge.

Sep 22, 2014


Rauschenberg and Walter Hopps discussing *Minutiae*(1954) during the installation of the retrospective exhibition *Robert Rauschenberg*, National Collection of Fine Arts, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, 1976.  Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni

The foundation, in partnership with Artsy, is hosting a competition for undergraduate and graduate students worldwide.  Win the opportunity to mount a Rauschenberg exhibition at your campus.

The competition intends to foster a new generation of curators by providing online access to digital resources and collections, as well as to explore new curatorial perspectives, scholarship, and dialogues on art. The competition launches today, September 22, 2014, and closes October 20, 2014. Please visit Artsy.net for full guidelines to participate, and visit the Artist section of our website to begin your research and explore Rauschenberg's life and work in depth. 

Sep 8, 2014


Designer Una Lee presents at the Opening Ceremony of the 2014 Allied Media Conference. Photo: Ara Hawrani

Today, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation announced the launch of an open call for proposals for artists whose work intersects with activism. Up to $100,000 in project support and up to $10,000 in travel and research grants will be provided to artists and collectives working to address pressing challenges facing societies in the U.S. and beyond. The term artist has been broadly defined to include artists of all disciplines, architects, cultural workers, designers, master craftsmen, musicians, performers, photographers, storytellers, cultural organizers, etc. To read the press release click here, or visit the Artist as Activist program page in our Grants section.

Sep 6, 2014


The Ancient Incident (Kabal American Zephyr), 1981

Shuffle makes available selections from the Rauschenberg Foundation art collection for exhibition in art institutions throughout the United States. Joining philanthropic initiative with the goal of nurturing the artist’s legacy, Shuffle loans are underwritten by the Foundation. Projects can range from a focused presentation of a single artwork to exhibitions of numerous works. Committed to audience development and new scholarship, the program seeks to connect with university and regional museums. Shuffle encourages dialogue with partnering institutions’ collections.

The program draws its name from Rauschenberg’s Synapsis Shuffle (1999), a painting comprised of fifty-two parts, as in a deck of cards. The work is realized when collaborators choose and assemble at least three and no more than seven panels, generating myriad variations. Every participant who arranges and re-arranges the parts is credited as a composer of the work. Past players include musician David Byrne, artist Chuck Close, choreographer Merce Cunningham, curator Walter Hopps, and gallerist Ileana Sonnabend.

In the spirit of its namesake, the program invites collaboration with partnering institutions to start conversations, continue arguments, and foster new perspectives. The proposition: take Rauschenberg’s works as inspiration, counterpoint, or at their most basic, as objects of contemplation and deep looking. Shuffle is both a tribute to the artist’s life and oeuvre as well as a venture to cultivate his public.

Please visit the newly launched website: shuffle.rauschenbergfoundation.org

Featuring the current exhibition, Rauschenberg: Collecting & Connecting, on view at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University through January 11, 2015: shuffle.rauschenbergfoundation.org/exhibitions/nasher/

Rauschenberg: Collecting & Connecting presents a dialogue between selections from the Nasher Museum's collection and over thirty artworks on loan from the Rauschenberg Foundation.

Jul 7, 2014


Rauschenberg and curator Walter Hopps, installing Minutiae (1954) for the retrospective exhibition, Robert Rauschenberg, National Collection of Fine Arts, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 1976. Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni, www.gianfrancogorgoni.it

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation has partnered with Artsy to create an Emerging Curator Competition for graduate and undergraduate students world-wide.  Our objectives are to increase access to art and archival resources digitally; to create a program to benefit aspiring curators and their institutions; and to foster new scholarship. In keeping with that vision, the competition encourages a new generation of curators to use digital tools to bring new views and ideas to global audiences.  

The jury for the Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition is comprised of five renowned artists, curators, and scholars—John Elderfield, Branden Joseph, Shirin Neshat, Christopher Rauschenberg, and Sarah Roberts—who will evaluate exhibition proposals that are related to the work of Robert Rauschenberg either presented on its own or juxtaposed with the work of other artists and artworks. Participants will submit exhibition proposals on Artsy.net, choosing from images selected by the Rauschenberg Foundation and from the 40,000 images provided by Artsy’s 230 museum and institutional partners, including the British Museum, Fondation Beyeler, J. Paul Getty Trust, Guggenheim Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and others. In-depth research and archival materials will be accessible via the new Rauschenberg Foundation website and the SFMOMA Rauschenberg Research Project.  

In the spirit of Robert Rauschenberg, the jury seeks proposals that make unexpected connections and ponder new lines of questioning. In a career that spanned more than fifty years, Rauschenberg continually pushed the boundaries by using a multidisciplinary approach and defying expectation. His commitment to innovation and his fearless approach to art are characteristics that the jury will evaluate in the online exhibition proposals.

The judges will select three finalists whose proposals will be featured on both the Artsy.net and the Rauschenberg Foundation website and the winner will be selected by the general public through online voting. The winner will be awarded: 1) a letter of award signed by the panel of judges; 2) the winning curatorial proposal will be designed as an online exhibition on Artsy.net; and 3) a curatorial fellowship and honorarium enabling the winner to select works from the Rauschenberg Foundation Shuffle artwork lending library to curate an exhibition at the winner’s academic institution.

Central to the mission of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is fostering the legacy of the artist’s work and his long-term commitment to art education by providing broad public access to art. The foundation strives to encourage students and aspiring curators to actively engage with the work of Rauschenberg, his collaborators, and the artists who have been inspired by him. With the Robert Rauschenberg Emerging Curator Competition, the foundation seeks to nurture Rauschenberg scholarship and to expand the study of art through current digital means. When the new Rauschenberg Foundation website launches in late summer, students, aspiring curators, and the general public will have unprecedented access and information on Rauschenberg’s artwork and archives.

Artsy (Artsy.net) is a free online resource for learning about and collecting art, and it will host the competition as part of its ongoing mission to increase education and public access to art from around the world.